Nov 17, 2019  
2017-2018 Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Accounting

  
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    ACCT& 201 - Principles of Accounting I

    5 Credits


    Generally accepted accounting principles and their application in determining assets, liabilities and equity; determination of periodic incomes; presentation of accounting systems and reports. Designed for business transfer students.

    Course Note Previously ACCTG 201. Recom: Sophomore standing and ACCTG 121.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Business transfer students.
    Active Date 2014-04-24

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Transferable Elective
    Course Outline
    A. Uses of Accounting Information and the Financial Statements

    B. Analyzing Transactions

    C. Measuring Business Income

    D. Financial Reporting and Analysis

    E. Operating Cycle, Merchandising Operations, Internal Control

    F. Accounting for Inventories

    G. Cash and Receivables

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze business transactions and determine when the transaction should be recorded, which accounts the transaction affects, and what dollar amounts to record using generally accepted accounting procedures.

    Record the transaction in the accounting records using journal entries or “T” accounts and to determine the impact on the accounting equation after the transaction has been recorded.

    Summarize the recorded accounting transactions to general ledgers (or “T” accounts), trial balances and work sheets, financial statements, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, or management reports.

    Communicate accounting information by listening, speaking clearly, and producing written documents that meet standards of accuracy and accepted accounting procedures when dealing with the organizations’ stakeholders.

    Research accounting authorities and business practices, and develop recommendations for the treatment of business transactions consistent with using generally accepted accounting procedures and ethical standards.

    Analyze the use of company resources on current operations and assess the implications and consequences of using these resources on future operations.

    Use accounting information as feedback to assess company plans and company performance by comparing those plans to actual results of company operations and determining the reasons and impact of the differences.

    Perform duties individually or in teams using appropriate policies, guidance, ethical standards, and management directions.

  
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    ACCT& 202 - Principles of Accounting II

    5 Credits
    Continue with generally accepted accounting principles; analysis of assets, liabilities and equity; analysis of financial statements and statement of cash flows. Designed for business transfer students.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Course Note Previously ACCTG 202.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Business transfer students.
    Active Date 2014-04-24

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Transferable Elective
    Course Outline
    A.  Plant Assets and Intangibles
    B.  Current Liabilities
    C.  Long-term Liabilities
    D.  Equity transactions
    E.  Reporting and analyzing cash flows
    F.  Analysis of financial statements

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze business transactions and determine when the transaction should be recorded, which accounts the transaction affects, and what dollar amounts to record using generally accepted accounting procedures.

    Record the transaction in the accounting record using journal entries or “T” accounts and to determine the impact on the accounting equation after the transaction has been recorded.

    Summarize the recorded accounting transactions to general ledgers (or “T” accounts), trial balances and work sheets, financial statements, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, or management reports.

    Communicate accounting information by listening, speaking clearly, and producing written documents that meet standards of accuracy and accepted accounting procedures when dealing with the organizations’ stakeholders.

    Research accounting authorities and business practices, and develop recommendations for the treatment of business transactions consistent with using generally accepted accounting procedures and ethical standards.

    Analyze the use of company resources on current operations and assess the implications and consequences of using these resources on future operations.

    Use accounting information as feedback to assess company plans and company performance by comparing those plans to actual results of company operations and determining the reasons and impact of the differences.

    Perform duties individually or in teams using appropriate policies, guidance, ethical standards, and management directions.

  
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    ACCT& 203 - Principles of Accounting III

    5 Credits
    Discusses using accounting information within the business organization for planning, decision making and control. Emphasis on the analytical approach in problem solving. Designed for the business transfer student.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0 or ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Course Note Previously ACCTG 203.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Business transfer student.
    Active Date 2015-06-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Transferable Elective
    Course Outline
    A. Cost terms, concepts, and classifications
    B. Job-Order and Process Costing Systems
    C. Cost behavior analysis and cost-volume-profit relationships
    D. Prepare financial and capital budgets
    E. Analyze budgets and prepare variance reports
    F. Develop relevant costs for decision making
    G. Introduce Activity Based Costing, Just-in-Time, Total Quality Management, and Theory of Constraints

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze business transactions and determine the impact on company plans, directing and motivating employees, and evaluating company and employee performance.

    Analyze general ledgers, work sheets, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, management reports, business risk, and the company’s environment and identify data and information needed for making future plans.

    Analyze general ledgers, work sheets, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, management reports, business risk, and the business environment and identify data and information needed for making routine and non routine decisions.

    Communicate accounting information by listening, speaking clearly, and producing written documents that meet standards of accuracy and accepted managerial accounting procedures when dealing with the organizations’ stakeholders.

    Research accounting authorities and business practices, and develop recommendations for the treatment of business transactions consistent with using generally accepted accounting procedures, company plans, and ethical standards.

    Analyze the use of company resources on current operations and assess the implications and consequences of using these resources on future operations.

    Use accounting information as feedback to assess company plans and company performance by comparing those plans to actual results of company operations and determining the reasons and impact of the differences.

    Perform duties individually or in teams using appropriate policies, guidance, ethical standards, and management directions.

  
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    ACCTG 121 - Practical Accounting

    5 Credits
    Use traditional paper-based journals and ledgers to analyze, record and report financial information for a sole proprietorship-service and merchandising.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Vocational Accounting, Business Transfer, Students seeking to update math skills
    Active Date 2014-04-24

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: ProfTech Computation
    Course Outline
    A.    Analyzing, measuring, and recording business transactions.
    B.    Accounting for cash and payroll.
    C.    Using special journals.
    D.    Year-end closing process.
    E.    Creating financial statements.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyzing business transactions, recognizing when the transaction should be recorded, classifying the transaction, measuring the dollar amount, recording the transaction in the electronic or manual accounting system using journal entries or accounts, and understanding the impact on the accounting equation after the transaction has been recorded.

    Summarizing accounting data to general ledgers (or accounts), trial balances and work sheets, financial statements, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, or management reports.

    Communicating through written or oral reports, statements, images, data, and other forms of accounting information to those who have an interest (stakeholders) in the economic entity.

    Analyzing and interpreting business transactions, financial data, and notes to make decisions about the allocation of resources and to assess the implications and consequences of conclusions.

    Using accounting information and other information to make decisions (for example, short term budget and long range business plan or financial analysis) about future operations.

    Using accounting information as feedback to assess prior decisions by comparing those decisions to actual results and determining the impact of differences.

    Performing duties individually or in teams in accordance with accepted accounting rules and regulations, laws, and ethical standards.

  
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    ACCTG 124 - Accounting with Microcomputers

    5 Credits
    Introduction to computer-based accounting utilizing PCs to further understand the accounting cycle in the management and processing of business financial data in a computer environment.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Non-transfer/Vocational course
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Fundamental accounting equation, debit and credit, transaction identification, journalizing, completing the accounting cycle, reports, financial analysis, creating a computerized accounting system.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Understanding the accounting equation, DR=CR, chart of accounts, accounting cycle.

    Identify business transactions to be recorded in the accounting system.

    Determine the classification of accounts affected by business transactions to be recorded.

    Determine the specific accounts within the classification which is affected.

    Determine the way in which the proposed transaction affect the identified accounts.

    Select the proper journal/window for recording the transaction.

    Journalize the transaction.

    Create internal and external financial reports.

    Understand the significance of and the need for financial reporting.

    Set up a computerized accounting system.

  
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    ACCTG 128 - Not-for-Profit Accounting

    5 Credits
    Basics of accounting for not-for-profit organizations; topics include accounting for restricted, partly restricted, and unrestricted assets; accounting for donations and volunteer hours, required financial disclosure, and notes to the not-for-profit financial statements.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve 1. People seeking a career in not-for-profit accounting. 2. People currently employed by not-for-profit entities and seeking a better understanding of the accounting and budgeting process. 3. Accounting majors exploring career opportunities. 4. Citizens seeking a better understanding of not-for-profit financial disclosure.
    Active Date 2015-02-09

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: ProfTech Computation
    Course Outline
    A. Fundamental GAAP Accounting and Bookkeeping Concepts
    B. Basic Budgeting
    C. Accounting for Restricted, Partly Restricted, and Unrestricted Assets
    D. Analyzing, Measuring, and Recording Not-For-Profit Transactions
    E. Financial Reporting
    F. Administrative Expenses vs. Program Expenses
    G. Nonprofit Accounting with QuickBooks

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyzing not-for-profit transactions, recognizing when the transaction should be recorded, classifying the transaction, measuring the dollar amount, recording the transaction in the electronic (QuickBooks) or manual accounting system using journal entries, and understanding the impact on the not-for-profit accounting equation after the transaction has been recorded.

    Summarizing accounting data to general ledgers (or not-for-profit chart of accounts), trial balances and work sheets, financial statements, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, or management reports.

    Communicating through written or oral reports, statements, images, data, and other forms of accounting information to those who have an interest (management, donors, regulatory agencies, etc.) in the not-for-profit entity.

    Analyzing and interpreting not-for-profit transactions, financial data, and notes to make decisions about the allocation of resources and to assess the implications and consequences of program effectiveness.

    Using accounting information and other information to make decisions (for example, short term budget and long range business plan or financial analysis) about future operations.

    Using accounting information as feedback to assess prior decisions by comparing those decisions to actual results and determining the impact of differences.

    Performing duties individually or in teams in accordance with accepted accounting rules and regulations, laws, and ethical standards.

  
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    ACCTG 139 - PRE CO-OP WORK SEMINAR

    1 Credits
    The seminar is taken at least one quarter before the student enrolls in CO-OP Work Experience (ACCTG 140/240) internship. This seminar teaches the student job searching skills (preparing a resume and cover letter, developing interviewing skills, and locating potential employers). The seminar also assesses the students skills, interests, and career goals and matches these to small/micro businesses.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note This course requires work experience to be coordinated with the instructor
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in Accounting programs or related who choose or are required to do an internship.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 40
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 11
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Matching students with small/micro businesses for internships 2. Networking and sharing work experiences by brainstorming work place problems and solutions 3. Developing work place communication skills 4. Creating resumes and cover letters and developing job search skills 5. Practicing interview skills 6. Completing internship paperwork

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Assessing the stduent skills and interests and matching these with small/micro businesses for internships

    Developing work place communication skills

    Creating resumes and cover letters and developing job search skills

  
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    ACCTG 140 - CO-OP WORK EXPERIENCE

    5 Credits
    Students combine classroom theory with practical work experience. Experience gained in the workplace is related to the student’s field of study or career goals.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note This course requires work experience to be coordinated with the instructor.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students enrolled in an accounting certificate or AAS degree program.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Class Limit 40
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 150 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 150
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Career development or exploration through work experience. 2. Setting and accomplishing goals. 3. Applying classroom knowledge to a work environment. 4. Developing and employing successful work habits and attitudes. 5. Building communication skills.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyzing business transactions, classifying the transaction, measuring the dollar amount, recording the transaction in accordance with accepted accounting principles and tax regulations.

    Summarizing accounting data to general ledgers, trial balances and work sheets, financial statements, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, tax returns, or management reports.

    Documenting and communicating through written or oral reports, statements, images, and/or data to owners of the economic entity.

    Analyzing and interpreting business transactions, financial data, and notes to make recommendations about the allocation of resources and to assess the implications and consequences of conclusions.

    Using accounting information and other information to make recommendations (for example, short term budget and long range business plan or financial analysis) about future operations.

    Using accounting information as feedback to assess prior decisions by comparing those decisions to actual results and determining the impact of differences.

    Performing duties individually or in teams in accordance with accepted accounting rules and regulations, laws, ethical standards, employment agreements, and cooperative education course requirements.

  
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    ACCTG 145 - Business Taxes and Payroll Accounti

    5 Credits
    Covers the requirements and laws in payroll accounting and related taxes: income tax, social security, unemployment and Washington industrial insurance. Introduces students to the current changes in payroll taxes and complete the automated payroll program as the capstone course project.

    Course Note Recom: ACCTG 121.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students desiring an AAS Degree in General Business specializing in accounting.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Introduction to payroll tax processing and the laws that govern and regulate payroll accounting. Research current payroll tax laws and complete a computerized payroll project as the final capstone project.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Identify the various laws that affect employers in their payroll operations. Examine recordkeeping requirements. Describe Human Resources Department employment procedures. Understand personnel records uses by businessess and identy and be able to create a payroll register.

    Understanding of Laws Related to Taxes such as the Fir Labor Stanmdards Act. Define and describe the records collected for payroll data.

    Explain coverage under the Federal Income Tax Withholding Law. Explain the type of withholding allowances. Compute the amount of federal withholding and understand reporting requiements.

    Describe the basic requirements for classification as an employee versus a contractor. Compute the federal unemployment taxes. Prepare manual payroll and computerized payroll using registers, earnings records, journals and various quarterly and yearly tax forms.

  
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    ACCTG 215 - Accounts Receivable/Accounts Payable

    5 Credits
    Generally accepted accounting principles and standard business practices and their application in determining accounts receivable and accounts payable, including cash collections and payments, state and local taxes, and accounting systems and reports. Designed for students desiring an Accounting AAS degree or certificate.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0 or ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students desiring an AAS degree or Certificate specializing in accounting.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    A. Accounting for Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable Transactions B. Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable Financial Reporting C. Analyzing Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable Transactions D. Processing Delinquent Accounts E. Calculating and Reporting State and Local taxes F. Operating Cycle and Internal Control G. Accounts Receivable and Accounts Payable and the Cash Cycle

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze AR/AP and assess the implications and consequences on cash resources and future operations. Discuss with management the impact of company AR/AP policies and procedures on cash resources. Maintain and protect basic information systems, accounting records, and customer and supplier information.

    Analyze business transactions and determine when the transaction should be recorded as AR or AP, which customer accounts the transaction affects, and what dollar amounts to record using generally accepted accounting procedures

    Communicate AR/AP accounting information that meet standards of accuracy and accepted accounting procedures when dealing with customers and vendors inquiries and the organizations’ other stakeholders when generating other reports. Protect basic information systems, accounting records, and customer and supplier information from unnecessary disclosure.

    Develop AR/AP information as feedback to assess company plans and company performance by comparing those plans to actual results of company operations and determining the reasons and impact of the differences.

    Perform duties individually or in teams using appropriate policies, guidance, ethical standards, and management directions.

    Record the transaction in the accounting records using journal entries or “T” accounts and to determine the impact on the accounting equation after the transaction has been recorded.

    Research accounting authorities and business practices, and develop recommendations for the treatment of AR/AP business transactions consistent with using generally accepted accounting procedures and ethical standards. Use an understanding of basic business principles and organizational priorities to make decisions about work being performed.

    Summarize the recorded AR/AP accounting transactions to general ledgers (or “T” accounts) subsidiary ledgers,trial balances and work sheets, financial statements, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, state tax reports, or management reports.

  
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    ACCTG 217 - Income Tax Procedures

    5 Credits
    Provides an introduction to taxation with the primary focus being on Individual Income tax laws, regulations, judicial resources, and administrative requirements. Provides the foundation and fundamental background for conducting tax research and resolving issues involving individual Income taxation.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0 or ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Business students interested in tax law and accounting.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Writing of research papers, processing complicated tax returns using the income tax formula. Students gain a working knowledge of the tax formula to be able to solve tax return problems.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Gain an understanding of tax law and how it originated.

    Gain an understanding of how to research tax issues and the techniques use to accomplish this objective.

    Ability to communicate tax issues via written research papers written in proper ADA format.

    Develop the ability to work in groups on difficult tax issues and strive to adhere to reporting deadlines and objectives.

  
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    ACCTG 240 - CO-OP Work Experience

    5 Credits
    Students combine classroom theory with practical work experience. Experience gained in the workplace is related to the student’s field of study or career goals.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note This course requires work experience to be coordinated with the instructor.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students enrolled in an accounting certificate or AAS degree program.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Class Limit 40
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 150 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 150
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Career development or exploration through work experience. 2. Setting and accomplishing goals. 3. Applying classroom knowledge to a work environment. 4. Developing and employing successful work habits and attitudes. 5. Building communication skills.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyzing business transactions, classifying the transaction, measuring the dollar amount, recording the transaction in accordance with accepted accounting principles and tax regulations.

    Summarizing accounting data to general ledgers, trial balances and work sheets, financial statements, annual reports, regulatory agency reports, tax returns, or management reports.

    Documenting and communicating through written or oral reports, statements, images, and/or data to owners of the economic entity.

    Analyzing and interpreting business transactions, financial data, and notes to make recommendations about the allocation of resources and to assess the implications and consequences of conclusions.

    Using accounting information and other information to make recommendations (for example, short term budget and long range business plan or financial analysis) about future operations.

    Using accounting information as feedback to assess prior decisions by comparing those decisions to actual results and determining the impact of differences.

    Performing duties individually or in teams in accordance with accepted accounting rules and regulations, laws, ethical standards, employment agreements, and cooperative education course requirements.

  
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    ACCTG 291 - Special Studies

    1 Credits
    An individual study project developed by student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0 or ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Candidates for AA transfer degree.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 19
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 55
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Examine advanced issues of generally accepted accounting principals. Perform research and analysis of accounting issues.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    To learn about capital expenditures and cost allocation methods.

    To explain and record transactions related to current and long-term liabilities, interest on liabilities, and the time value of money.

    To record and report transactions related to contributed capital and retained earnings, and analyze stockholders’ equity.

    To prepare and analyze the Statement of Cash Flows.

    To develop techniques used in analyzing the primary financial statements.

    To complete an accounting practice project.

    To provide opportunities for development of interpersonal and writing skills.

  
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    ACCTG 293 - Special Studies

    1 Credits
    An individual study project developed by student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0 or ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Candidates for AA transfer degree.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 19
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 165
    Total Contact Hours 165
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Examine advanced issues of generally accepted accounting principals. Perform research and analysis of accounting issues.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    To learn about capital expenditures and cost allocation methods.

    To explain and record transactions related to current and long-term liabilities, interest on liabilities, and the time value of money.

    To record and report transactions related to contributed capital and retained earnings, and analyze stockholders’ equity.

    To prepare and analyze the Statement of Cash Flows.

    To develop techniques used in analyzing the primary financial statements.

    To complete an accounting practice project.

    To provide opportunities for development of interpersonal and writing skills.

  
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    ACCTG 294 - Special Studies

    1 Credits
    An individual study project developed by student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0 or ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Candidates for AA transfer degree.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 19
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 220
    Total Contact Hours 220
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Examine advanced issues of generally accepted accounting principals. Perform research and analysis of accounting issues.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    To learn about capital expenditures and cost allocation methods.

    To explain and record transactions related to current and long-term liabilities, interest on liabilities, and the time value of money.

    To record and report transactions related to contributed capital and retained earnings, and analyze stockholders’ equity.

    To prepare and analyze the Statement of Cash Flows.

    To develop techniques used in analyzing the primary financial statements.

    To complete an accounting practice project.

    To provide opportunities for development of interpersonal and writing skills.

  
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    ACCTG 295 - Special Studies

    5 Credits
    An individual study project developed by student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Pre-requisite(s) ACCTG 121 min 2.0 or ACCT& 201 min 2.0
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Candidates for AA transfer degree.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 19
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 275
    Total Contact Hours 275
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Examine advanced issues of generally accepted accounting principals. Perform research and analysis of accounting issues.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    To learn about capital expenditures and cost allocation methods.

    To explain and record transactions related to current and long-term liabilities, interest on liabilities, and the time value of money.

    To record and report transactions related to contributed capital and retained earnings, and analyze stockholders’ equity.

    To prepare and analyze the Statement of Cash Flows.

    To develop techniques used in analyzing the primary financial statements.

    To complete an accounting practice project.

    To provide opportunities for development of interpersonal and writing skills.


ACHIEVE

  
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    ACHV 010 - ACHIEVE Career Inventory

    5 Credits
    This course enables students to use their previous experiences, skills, interests, and assessments to guide career development. Students set short and long term employment goals, practice interviewing, and development employment related materials such as resume, cover letter, and diversity statement.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students with low basic skills that impede access to vocational, educational and social advancement.
    Active Date 2014-07-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    I. Orientation II. Work history, interests, skills, values, and work disposition III. Career interest assessment and occupational research IV. Resume, cover letter, and diversity statement V. Informational interviewing Vi. Mock interviewing

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. To identify interest patterns, abilities, skills, and work related values.

    2. To accurately research current information and data on possible careers resulting in a tentative career choice or list of related occupations.

    3. To identify individual skills and interests and select a tentative short and long term employment goal.

    4. To practice, demonstrate, and evaluate your own interview skills.

    5. Develop career search materials including a resume, cover letter, and diversity statement.

  
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    ACHV 011 - ACHIEVE Orientation and Success Seminar

    2 Credits
    Provides an opportunity for students to develop tools to prepare themselves for academic, employment, and personal success. Specific emphasis on academic and career goal setting, resources, and success strategies. Topics include study skills, goal-setting, college policies and resources, programmatic requirements, and accessing local and state resources, academic and career planning, time management, relationships, and self-empowerment. This course may be offered at one or two credits and elements will vary depending upon the number of credits.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Designed to meet the needs of students enrolling in the ACHIEVE program.
    Active Date 2014-07-03

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-2
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    i. Course overview ii. What is college all about? What is ACHIEVE? iii.What must you know and do? iv. Highline Community College policies and resources v. Local, state, and federal agencies vi. Understanding ourselves and our goals; planning for success vii. Success strategies

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate an understanding of the policies and resources at Highline

    Recognize and articulate programmatic expectations

    Show awareness of self and academic and career goals and plan for success

    Demonstrate understanding of local, state, and federal resources

  
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    ACHV 030 - Communication and Self Advocacy

    5 Credits
    The course enables students to develop an understanding of the key differences between the child and adult serve structures for people with disabilities. Course provides a framework for disclosure of disability in academic and career settings. Students will explore the advantages and disadvantages of disclosure while practicing self-advocacy skills in school and work-based environments. Students explore the differences between causal and professional communication and demonstrate effective communication strategies in higher education and employment settings.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students with low basic skills that impede access to academic, vocational, and social advancement.
    Active Date 2014-07-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    i. Orientation ii. Dynamics of Communication iii. Oral Communication: listening, language, nonverbal iv. Managing Conflict v. Differences between youth and adult services for people with disabilities vi. Reasonable accommodations vii. Disclosure of disability viii. Practice and demonstrate basic principles of interpersonal communication and self-advocacy

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Identify key differences between youth and adult service systems for people with disabilities.

    Understand, identify, and practice requesting reasonable accommodations

    Recognize the advantages and disadvantages of disclosure of disability in academic and work based settings.

    Students will identify and demonstrate basic principles of interpersonal communication through performance-based activities, oral presentations, class discussions, and research/reflective written assignments.

    Demonstrate an understanding of the key differences between casual and professional communication

    Practice and demonstrate active listening skills, asking questions, and giving feedback.

  
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    ACHV 053 - ACHIEVE Practicum Seminar

    3 Credits
    Students will participate in the practicum seminar while simultaneously completing community-based internships, combining classroom theory with practical experience gained in the workplace. The practicum experiences are tied directly to students’ career goals and employment plan developed with Employment Consultant and employment agency. Students will discuss and track progress toward practicum learning outcomes, discuss issues and concerns that happen on the job with instructors and peers, and role-play effective on the job communication strategies.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve ACHIEVE students who are completing community based internships
    Active Date 2014-07-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    -Introduction -Site selection is made with Employment Consultant and meets department and agency criteria -Goal-setting and development of measurable learning objectives -Weekly summary or progress toward goals are turned in to Employment Consultant listing hours worked, duties performed, and skills developed and includes reflection and comfort level performing tasks and duties. -Completion of employer and student evaluation forms

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Complete accurate, thoughtful, and high quality learning objectives, and additional cooperative education documentation including agency required reporting.

    Self-evaluate progress progress made on practicum learning outcomes

    Perform and describe assigned duties in a friendly and courteous manner and accept feedback.

    Demonstrate and document effective communication with a variety of people and contribute to a team environment.

    Document arrival to the workplace on time for scheduled work hours, prepared for work, and professional in appearance

    Identify ways to show initiative and ways for improvement in the completion of assigned tasks.

    Analyze problems and choose and discuss appropriate solutions, seeking clarification when necessary.

    Communicate and document real world experience related to career goals.

  
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    ACHV 082 - Asst Tech Lab/Academic Success Seminar

    4 Credits
    Provides opportunities for ACHIEVE students to practice using assistive technologies,explore learning styles, and develop study and test-taking strategies. Students can also use the lab time to get additional support with reading strategies and navigating college courses.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve ACHIEVE students
    Active Date 2015-11-19

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-4
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 44 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 44
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    -Establish organizational system of classroom material and syllabi
    -Conduct learning styles assessments
    -Textbook reading
    -Technology based learning
    -Test taking strategies
    -Time management skills


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Identify individual needs for support and make a plan to get needs met through enrollment in learning lab

    Explore and practice using a variety of assistive technologies

    Develop effective learning, technology, and test-taking strategies

    Establish a realistic study schedule

    Practice study skills in a supervised setting

  
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    ACHV 098 - ACHIEVE: Synthesis, Analysis, and Capstone

    3 Credits
    This course enable students to prepare a portfolio of their work within ACHIEVE, which will allow them to track and be aware of their own growth, accomplishments, learning, and employment readiness. The portfolio serves as their culminating project.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve ACHIEVE students
    Active Date 2015-11-19

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    i. Orientation
    ii. The meaning of a portfolio in assessment
    iii. Exploring and evaluating elements and formats
    iv. Gathering and analyzing artifacts
    v. Presenting a plan
    vi. A plan for modification
    vii. Presentation


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Recognize and understand the portofolio process as a means of recording, showcasing, and measure progress toward education and career goals.

    Identify elements and format of a portfolio that most effectively showcases individual skills and experiences

    Analyze learning and progress toward goals by critically evaluating artifacts of individual work and experiences within the classroom, campus, community, and workplace

    Learn to develop and use audio-visual aids effectively.

    Present portfolio to an identified audience to celebrate and commit to further development


Adult Basic Education

  
  •  

    ABE 002 - ESL Pre-Literacy

    10 Credits
    Designed for adults who have little to no literacy in their native language and who have extremely limited proficiency in the English language. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills. ESL 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores 190 and below.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This course is designed to serve ESL students whose English proficiency is at the pre-literacy level.
    Active Date 2014-06-06

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Entrance assessment of existing skill level. 2. Introduction to and mastery of Level Pre-Literacy Exit criteria and SLOs through class assignments, small group work and lecture. 3. Exit assessment of existing skill level.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Recognize everyday words or word groups by decoding letter-sound correspondence, isolating and saying first and last sounds, naming pictures to isolate and say initial sounds, sounding out words by segmenting words into separate sounds and syllables, combining or blending sounds, recognizing simple rhyming word patterns, or recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.

    Understand concepts of print, letter shapes, letter names and sounds (individual consonants and vowels, digraphs and blends), and common vocabulary.

    Find familiar words in a list.

    Use very simple reading strategies such as rereading or making word lists.

    Use what you already know to understand information in simple phrases

    Follow directions about audience and purpose for writing.

    Follow a highly structured model to organize information about self, immediate needs or everyday topics in lists or a few sentences by copying and substituting.

    Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and correctly use simple, everyday, highly familiar words, numbers and simple phrases to communicate about personal names, signatures, addresses, dates, phone numbers, and prices

    Make a few simple changes of handwriting, spelling, and punctuation, after others or the teacher read your paper and give suggestions.

    Understand and respond to simple words and phrases in simple questions, statements, high frequency commands, short conversations, explanations, instructions, simple narratives

  
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    ABE 008 - ABE Math 1

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic math skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities. ABE Level 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores below 201.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have basic math skills.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students improve their basic math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in a lecture format and group settings.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Read, write, and interpret very simple types of mathematical information such as:
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers (three digit numbers), common monetary values, and benchmark fractions (1/2, 1/4).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: very simple patterns, commonly-used denominations/groupings (2s, 5s, 10s); mathematical relationships — more, less, larger, smaller, left, right, heavier, longer.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: high frequency standard units of measurement (pounds, feet, months, weeks, days, minutes, hours), and concepts of geometric shape, length and width.
    Data/Statistics: very simple ways to interpret and represent data (check sheets, picture graphs,) emphasizing frequency of occurrence.

    Recall and use a few simple mathematical procedures such as very basic estimating, counting, sorting, ordering, grouping, adding on (using counting or a calculator), orally counting by 2s, 5s and 10s, addition and subtraction and beginning multiplication. Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.

    Extract discrete information from simple and concrete data and graphs, describe patterns, and/or use basic computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.

    Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in role-plays, with pictures, or by entries on a simple chart.

    Identify and use basic computer hardware, and use MyHCC login and password to log on to Highline computers.

    Identify reasons for being in school, and some specific personal goals.

  
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    ABE 009 - ESL Civics Literacy

    3 Credits
    A study of United States history and government to prepare students who wish to pass a civics test for permanent residency.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Immigrant and refugee students.
    Active Date 2011-07-06

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course uses a wide range of materials that enable students to prepare to pass the civics test for permanent residency.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate understanding of US history and government sufficient for permanent residency

  
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    ABE 010 - ABE Language Arts 1

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores under 200.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have English skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-08-06

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Decode and recognize everyday words and word groups in short, simple sentences using word parts, syllables, pronunciation, picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words. Monitor accuracy.

    Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of print, letter shapes, letter names and sounds and simple, everyday content knowledge.

    Use prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts, understanding the information they contain, and locate important items of information in said texts. Enhance comprehension using various strategies.

    Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.

    Follow a structured, externally developed plan (or text model) to organize information about self and/or related to immediate needs.

    Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and appropriately use simple, every day, highly familiar words, numbers, and simple phrases to convey information with minimal attention to audience.

    Appropriately use every day, familiar vocabulary to produce sentences on a familiar topic.

    Make a few simple content changes based on review and feedback from others, and make a few simple edits of handwriting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

    Identify and use basic computer hardware, and use MyHCC login and password to log on to Highline computers

    With assistance, access and use learning websites or computer programs.

  
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    ABE 011 - Adult Basic Education Integrated Skills 1

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English and math skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores under 200.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have English and math skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-05-29

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language and math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Decode and recognize everyday words and word groups in short, simple sentences using word parts, syllables, pronunciation, picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words. Monitor accuracy.

    Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of print, letter shapes, letter names and sounds and simple, everyday content knowledge.

    Use prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts, understanding the information they contain, and locate important items of information in said texts. Enhance comprehension using various strategies.

    Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.

    Follow a structured, externally developed plan (or text model) to organize information about self and/or related to immediate needs.

    Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and appropriately use simple, every day, highly familiar words, numbers, and simple phrases to convey information with minimal attention to audience.

    Appropriately use every day, familiar vocabulary to produce sentences on a familiar topic.

    Make a few simple content changes based on review and feedback from others, and make a few simple edits of handwriting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

    Identify and use basic computer hardware, and use myHighline login and password to log on to Highline computers

    With assistance, access and use learning websites or computer programs.

  
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    ABE 012 - ABE Math 2

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic numeracy skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities. ABE Math level 2 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 201 and 210.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have basic numeracy skills.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students improve their basic numeracy skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in a lecture format and group settings.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Read, write, and interpret very simple types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers (three digit numbers), common monetary values, and benchmark fractions (1/2, 1/4) and percents (50%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: very simple patterns, commonly-used denominations/groupings (5s, 10s, 25s), and very simple proportions (2:1, 1:2).
    Space/Shape/Measurement: high frequency standard units of measurement (pounds, feet, quarts, gallons), geometric shapes, and concepts of length and width.
    Data/Statistics: very simple ways to interpret and represent data (checksheets, picture graphs, simple bar graphs, line plots) emphasizing frequency of occurrence.

    Begin to evaluate reasonableness of solutions. Add and subtract whole numbers through three digits, and multiply and divide three digit numbers by one digit numbers.

    Recall and use mathematical procedures such as basic estimating, counting, sorting, ordering, grouping, adding on (using counting or a calculator), and measuring length and weight using tools calibrated with whole numbers (rulers, manipulatives). Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.

    Extract discrete information from simple and concrete data and graphs, and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.

    Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in role-plays, with pictures, or by entries on a simple chart.

    Use computer programs and/or internet to practice math.

    Use a Highline username and password to log on to campus computers.

    Identify reasons for being in school and some specific personal goals.

  
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    ABE 013 - Adult Basic Education Integrated Skills 2

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English and math skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 201 and 210.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have basic skills below the High School level.
    Active Date 2014-05-27

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language and math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Decode, recognize, and use every day and some unfamiliar words in short text by drawing on content knowledge, oral vocabulary, sight words, word parts, pronunciation rules, and pace.

    Apply prior knowledge to assist in selecting and understanding simple texts, including information found on the internet.

    Monitor and enhance comprehension and locate important items of information in text using some simple strategies.

    Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.

    Follow a structured plan to identify and organize details and examples to support a single purpose, and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.

    Write simple and a few compound sentences, sometimes in short paragraphs with some effort but with few errors to independently accomplish simple, well defined, and structured writing activities in a few comfortable and familiar settings, including e-mail.

    Begin to use revision strategies including rereading and revising based on review and feedback from others.

    Make basic edits of grammar, simple and compound sentences, capitalization, spelling and punctuation

    Use computer programs and/or internet to practice Language Arts.

    Use a Highline username and password to log on to campus computers.

  
  •  

    ABE 014 - ABE Language Arts 2

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 201 and 210.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have English skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Decode, recognize, and use every day and some unfamiliar words in short text by drawing on content knowledge, oral vocabulary, sight words, word parts, pronunciation rules, and pace.

    Apply prior knowledge to assist in selecting and understanding simple texts, including information found on the internet.

    Monitor and enhance comprehension and locate important items of information in text using some simple strategies.

    Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.

    Follow a structured plan to identify and organize details and examples to support a single purpose, and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.

    Write simple and a few compound sentences, sometimes in short paragraphs with some effort but with few errors to independently accomplish simple, well defined, and structured writing activities in a few comfortable and familiar settings, including e-mail.

    Begin to use revision strategies including rereading and revising based on review and feedback from others.

    Make basic edits of grammar, simple and compound sentences, capitalization, spelling and punctuation.

    Use computer programs and/or internet to practice Language Arts.

    Use a Highline username and password to log on to campus computers.

  
  •  

    ABE 015 - Adult Basic Education Integrated Skills 3

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English and math skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 3 is equivalent to CASAS scores under 211-220.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students whose basic skills in reading, writing and math are below high school level.
    Active Date 2014-05-27

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language and math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Decode and use every day and some specialized words and abbreviations within text using content knowledge, oral vocabulary, word parts, pronunciation rules, and pace strategies.

    Locate important information in simple text using simple strategies, and use a computer to search for information.

    Monitor and enhance comprehension by using a range of simple strategies, and actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.

    Use simple planning strategies to identify and organize ideas to support a single purpose and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.

    Write simple narrative, informative, or expressive paragraphs and steps/ instructions/ commands/e-mail with some effort but with few errors, using structure and supporting details/examples with a purpose and audience in mind. Type, edit, and print a paragraph with correct formatting, and save and retrieve the document.

    Use simple revision strategies to monitor effectiveness of self and others, and demonstrate beginning attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for audience.

    Make several simple edits of grammar, spelling, and punctuate, sentence structure, usage, and text structure using tools such as spelling lists and simple editing checklists.

    Explore skills and interests related to a career on which you’ve done basic research.

    Identify and know how to use some college resources and educational funding options.

    Read, write, and interpret some common types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers, monetary values and prices, benchmark fractions (3/4, 1/10), decimals (.25, .50, .75, .10) and percents (25%, 75%, 10%, 100%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: simple patterns, probability and proportions (1:4, 4:1); simple decimal/fraction conversions and equivalents.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: commonly used standard units of measurement, common geometric shapes, and the concept of “area”.
    Data/Statistics: simple ways to interpret and represent data (tables, bar graphs with and without gridlines, line graphs and pie graphs).

  
  •  

    ABE 016 - ABE Math 3

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in numeracy skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities. ABE Level 3 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 211-220.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have numeracy skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students improve their numeracy skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in a lecture format and group settings.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Read, write, and interpret some common types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers, monetary values and prices, benchmark fractions (3/4, 1/10), decimals (.25, .50, .75, .10) and percents (25%, 75%, 10%, 100%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: simple patterns, probability and proportions (1:4, 4:1); simple decimal/fraction conversions and equivalents.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: commonly used standard units of measurement, common geometric shapes, and the concept of “area”.
    Data/Statistics: simple ways to interpret and represent data (tables, bar graphs with and without gridlines, line graphs and pie graphs).

    Recall and use mathematical procedures such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, benchmark decimals and fractions (with or without use of calculator), grouping, comparing 2 numbers, and basic estimating; and measure length, weight, and areas of standard and non-standard shapes using tools calibrated with whole numbers and benchmark fraction and decimal equivalents (rulers, manipulatives). Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.

    Define, select, and organize simple data, and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.

    Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in pictures, or in writing.

    Use computer programs and/or internet to practice math.

    Use a Highline username and password to log on to campus computers.

  
  •  

    ABE 017 - ABE Language Arts 3

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 3 is equivalent to CASAS scores under 211-220.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have English skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Decode and use every day and some specialized words and abbreviations within text using content knowledge, oral vocabulary, word parts, pronunciation rules, and pace strategies.

    Locate important information in simple text using simple strategies, and use a computer to search for information.

    Monitor and enhance comprehension by using a range of simple strategies, and actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.

    Use simple planning strategies to identify and organize ideas to support a single purpose and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.

    Write simple narrative, informative, or expressive paragraphs and steps/ instructions/ commands/e-mail with some effort but with few errors, using structure and supporting details/examples with a purpose and audience in mind. Type, edit, and print a paragraph with correct formatting, and save and retrieve the document.

    Use simple revision strategies to monitor effectiveness of self and others, and demonstrate beginning attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for audience.

    Make several simple edits of grammar, spelling, and punctuate, sentence structure, usage, and text structure using tools such as spelling lists and simple editing checklists.

    Explore skills and interests related to a career on which you’ve done basic research.

    Identify and know how to use some college resources and educational funding options.

  
  •  

    ABE 018 - ABE Math 4

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in intermediate math skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities. ABE Math level 4 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 221 and 235.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have math skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students improve their intermediate math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in a lecture format and group settings.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Read, write, and interpret some common types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: monetary values, extensions of benchmark fractions (1/8, 1/3, 1/5, etc.), decimals, and percents (15%, 30%, etc.).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: patterns and simple formulas (such as d=rt, A=lw); Space/Shape/Measurement: standard units of measurement including fractional units and benchmark angle measurements (90 degrees, 360 degrees, etc), geometric shapes including shapes containing a combination of common shapes, concept of pi, and concept of converting between units of measurement.
    Data/Statistics: ways to interpret and represent data (tables and graphs with scaling, basic statistical concepts such as range, mode, mean, and median).

    Recall and use a good store of mathematical procedures such as estimation, rounding, multiplication and division (with and without use of a calculator), adding and subtracting, multiplying and dividing common fractional amounts and decimals, measure length, weight, area and circumference using tools calibrated to varying degrees of precision and converting units of measurement as appropriate. Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.

    Define, select and organize a variety of common mathematical data and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use appropriate procedures effectively to solve a problem and verify that the solution is reasonable.

    Communicate the solution to the problem orally, with visual representations, in writing, by entries in a table or appropriate graph, or with basic statistics (range, mode, mean, median).

    Use computer programs and/or internet to practice math.

  
  •  

    ABE 019 - Adult Basic Education Integrated Skills 4

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in intermediate English and math skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities. ABE Math level 4 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 221 and 235.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students whose basic skills fall below the high school level.
    Active Date 2014-05-27

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language and math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Recognize and use new and some specialized vocabulary and content

    Determine the reading purpose. Integrate with prior knowledge and select reading strategies appropriate to the purpose.

    Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies.

    Locate important information, read for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.

    Organize and analyze the information and reflect on its underlying meaning and source.

    Communicate in English both orally and in writing in a clear and organized manner to persuade, inform and convey ideas.

    Use multiple planning and pre-writing strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose.

    Write well-constructed paragraphs easily with few errors and independently accomplish well defined and structured writing activities for varied purposes and audiences.

    Use several simple revision strategies to monitor one’s own writing, make revisions based on review and feedback from others and produce rough and final drafts. Demonstrate some attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.

    Appropriately use a limited variety of simple and complex sentence structures in multiple coherent steps or a few well-constructed and linked paragraphs to convey ideas, with supporting facts/details/examples using appropriate language and level of formality for the intended audience.

  
  •  

    ABE 020 - ABE Language Arts 4

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 4 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 221-235.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have English skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Recognize and use new and some specialized vocabulary and content

    Determine the reading purpose. Integrate with prior knowledge and select reading strategies appropriate to the purpose.

    Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies.

    Locate important information, read for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.

    Organize and analyze the information and reflect on its underlying meaning and source.

    Communicate in English both orally and in writing in a clear and organized manner to persuade, inform and convey ideas.

    Use multiple planning and pre-writing strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose.

    Write well-constructed paragraphs easily with few errors and independently accomplish well defined and structured writing activities for varied purposes and audiences.

    Use several simple revision strategies to monitor one’s own writing, make revisions based on review and feedback from others and produce rough and final drafts. Demonstrate some attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.

    Appropriately use a limited variety of simple and complex sentence structures in multiple coherent steps or a few well-constructed and linked paragraphs to convey ideas, with supporting facts/details/examples using appropriate language and level of formality for the intended audience.

  
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    ABE 021 - ABE High School U. S. History

    5 Credits
    The development of the American peoples: history to 1900. Covers the role of the federal government and minority groups in America’s development, the U.S. role in world events, development of the U.S. political system and economic changes. Goal is to provide a view of American history to satisfy high school history requirement. This course fulfills the 1 credit requirement for a high school diploma.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who need US history requirement for high school completion or students who need to build vocabulary and comprehension skills in social science content area.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Development of the American peoples. 2. History to 1900 and since 1900. 3. Role of federal government. 4. Minority groups in America’s development. 5. The U.S. role in world events. 6. Development of the U.S. political system. 7. Economic changes.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Read social science textbooks and content comprehension and accuracy.

    2. Learn how societies have developed into different political and social systems.

    3. How they (the students) in their own lives, can make wiser decisions based on knowledge of past events.

    4. Develop college readiness skills such as textbook reading strategies, note taking, peer collaboration, and communication.

  
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    ABE 022 - High School Washington State Histor

    5 Credits
    A study of Washington: its people, geography, government and history. Civics is incorporated. Course goal is to provide students with information/instruction equivalent to high school graduation requirement to meet the required Washington State history, Pacific Northwest History and civics requirements.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve High School Completion Candidates who are under-prepared for college level classes.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Pacific Northwest History with an emphasis on Washington State history as social studies. 2. Prehistory and geography of the pacific northwest and Washington State. 3. Early exploration by sea. 4. Exploration by land. 5. Indian Treaties/Indian Wars. 6. Missionary Movement/Coming of the Railroads. 7. Resource and Industrial Development. 8. Washington State Constitution and Modern State Government. 9. Civics

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Read and answer questions about Native Americans, early settlers, and natural environment of Washington.

    2. Comprehend the politics, wars, treaties and civics which led to Washington statehood.

    3. Provide correct responses to question (following reading and videos)about Washington’s development in to the 20th century: economic changes, resources, industries, government.

  
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    ABE 023 - ESL Literacy Level 1

    10 Credits
     

    Designed for adults who may not be literate in any language and/or who have extremely limited proficiency in the English language. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills. ESL 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 181-193.


    Fees 

    Designed to Serve  

    This course is designed to serve ESL students whose English proficiency is at the literacy level (CASAS score of 180 and below).

    Active Date 20170731T09:56:44

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Range 5-12
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
     

    1. Entrance assessment of existing skill level. 
    2. Introduction to and mastery of Level 1 Exit criteria and SLOs through class assignments, small group work and lecture.
    3. Exit assessment of existing skill level. 


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate the ability to speak with a partner following topic prompts

    Demonstrate the ability to speak clearly in front of class

    Demonstrate ability to read many different beginning level texts (Lexile 190-530) by completing comprehension activities

    Identify evidence within text to ask and answer questions

    Demonstrate the ability to use the writing process to generate several (6+) original sentences on a specific topic,  both on paper and using technology

    Accurately use Level 1 writing conventions, learned vocabulary and grammar

  
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    ABE 024 - ABE HS Contemporary World Issues

    5 Credits
    Introduction to history and the role of the historian. Basic elements of contemporary world issues. Discussions on current events, government and geography of the world. This course fulfills the social studies contemporary world issues credit for a high school diploma.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve High School Completion candidates who are under prepared for college level social science classes.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Introduction to Contemporary World Issues; impact of past events; role of the historian. 2. People, geography, cultures. 3. National and international issues. 4. National and international economic factors. 5. The world today; progressive events the world.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Learn to read social science textbooks and content with comprehension and accuracy.

    2. Learn how societies have developed into different political and social systems.

    3. Connect world issues to individual lives and knowledge of past events.

    4. Analyze current events in a social, political, cultural, and historical context.

    5. Develop college readiness skills such as textbook reading strategies, note taking, peer collaboration, and communication.

  
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    ABE 025 - ESL Level 2 Beginning

    10 Credits
    Designed for adults who have extremely limited in the English language. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills. ESL 2 is equivalent to CASAS scores 194-206.  


    Fees 

    Designed to Serve  

    This course is designed to serve ESL students who have completed Level 1 of the exit criteria or who demonstrate proficiency suitable for Level 2. 

    Active Date 20170731T09:56:42

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Range 5-12
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
     

    1. Entrance assessment of existing skill level. 
    2. Introduction to and mastery of ESL Level 2 exit criteria and SLOs through class assignments, small group work, and lecture.
    3. Exit assessment of existing skill level. 


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate the ability to ask and answer questions with a partner

    Demonstrate the ability to present information for an audience using technology

    Demonstrate the ability to critically read and summarize a variety of texts for different purposes  (Lexile 420-650)

    Use evidence from text to ask and answer questions

    Use the writing process to generate a paragraph both on paper and using technology

    Use Level 2 writing conventions, learned vocabulary and grammar accurately

    Use technology to collaborate with others and conduct online research effectively

  
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    ABE 027 - ESL 3: Low Intermediate

    10 Credits
    Designed for adults who have limited proficiency in the English language. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills. ESL 3 is equivalent to CASAS scores 210-218.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This course is designed to serve ESL students who have completed Level 2 of the exit criteria or who demonstrate proficiency suitable for Level 3.
    Active Date 2014-04-25

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Entrance assessment of existing skill level. 2. Introduction to and mastery of Level 3 exit criteria and SLOs through class assignments, small group work, and lecture. 3. Exit assessment of existing skill level.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Understand most everyday and some unfamiliar words and topics in short to medium-length text of 1-3 pages using some strategies: break words into parts to help understanding; use pronunciation rules; read slowly when needed

    Find important information in increasingly complex text using some strategies: scan, read titles and headings

    Check and improve your understanding using strategies: remembering; rephrasing; retelling; using a dictionary

    Use what you already know to choose things to read and to understand information

    Decide the reason for communicating in writing and who the reader is

    Follow a highly structured plan to choose and organize a small number of ideas about a single topic

    Write a single paragraph with a topic sentence, supporting sentences, and concluding sentence

    Use familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning)

    Use correct capitalization, spelling, and punctuation

    Write using a variety of sentence types and ESL 3 verb tenses

  
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    ABE 028 - Survey of Life Principles

    5 Credits
    Examines major unifying concepts and methods of the life sciences from the cell to evolution. Includes laboratory.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve High school completion students. This course fulfills one credit of lab science for a high school diploma.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Ecological relationships among organisms, and between organisms and their environment; includes the study of major biomes. 2. Plant growth and function. 3. Cell structure, chemistry and function in living organisms. 4. Animal growth, development, and physiology. 5. Microbial organisms in nature. 6. Reproduction and inheritance. 7. Evolution as a process and as a unifying concept in biology. 8. The scientific experimental method in biology.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Explain the function of evolution as the unifying concept of biology.

    2. Describe the ecological interactions and interdependency of organisms and their environment.

    3. Explain physiology at the level of the cell and the organism.

    4. Distinguish between the nature of plants, animals, and microbes.

    5. Describe the importance of scientific method for science and in one’s daily life.

    6. Be familiar with laboratory techniques and the use of experiment and observation in the practice of science.

  
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    ABE 029 - ESL 4: High Intermediate

    10 Credits
    Designed for adults who have some proficiency in the English language. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills. ESL 4 is equivalent to CASAS scores 219-228.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This course is designed to serve ESL students who have completed Level 3 of the exit criteria or who demonstrate proficiency suitable for Level 4.
    Active Date 2014-04-25

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Entrance assessment of existing skill level. 2. Introduction to mastery of Level 4 exit criteria and SLOs through class assignments, small group work, and lecture. 3. Exit assessment of existing skill level.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Determine the purpose and follow written directions to complete a task; be able to troubleshoot (identify mistakes in performance and try again) if necessary

    Use increasingly complex reading strategies (including pre-reading tasks to activate prior knowledge, skimming, scanning, and using graphic organizers) to find the main ideas, supporting details, implied meaning, and cultural nuance (idioms, cultural knowledge); and decode new vocabulary words to find meaning

    Demonstrate knowledge of vocabulary words about community, job/career and college content, including recognition of word forms in word families and predicting how to pronounce a word when read aloud

    Use the writing process (determine the purpose and follow directions to complete a task; use simple planning strategies (including activating prior knowledge) to brainstorm and organize ideas; produce a comprehensible draft; use simple revision strategies with reference tools such as spelling word lists, writing rubrics, and simple editing checklists to edit and get feedback from others; and produce a comprehensible final draft)

    Use vocabulary words about community, job/career and college content accurately and appropriately

    Use simple, compound and complex sentences with a few errors while avoiding fragments and run-ons.

    Develop two or more well-linked paragraphs using topic sentence, supporting and concluding sentences in different genres such as simple narrative, informative, summary, or expressive paragraphs with beginning attention to personal voice

    Determine the purpose for listening and follow spoken directions to complete a task

    Use listening strategies including decoding new vocabulary words to find meaning; listening for main ideas, details, implied meaning, and cultural nuance (idioms, cultural knowledge, verbal and nonverbal cues); using graphic organizers; and asking for clarification to understand main ideas and some details in complex conversations, lectures, presentations, and instructional videos

    Understand and respond appropriately to complex conversations, explanations, and instructions using vocabulary words about community, job/career and college content

  
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    ABE 030 - ABE 030 High School General Science

    5 Credits
    General introduction to the basic principles of six individual sciences - astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth science, physics and physiology - at the high school competency level. This course fulfills the 1 credit general science requirement for a high school diploma.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve High School Completion students.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Introduction to Science 2. Physics 3. Chemistry 4. Earth Science 5. Astronomy 6. Biology 7. Physiology

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of general science, the scientific method; and system of measurement.

    2. Demonstrate knowledge of general principles of physics as well as specialized vocabulary.

    3. Show increased knowledge of basics of chemistry.

    4. Better understand three main parts of planet - land, sea, and air.

    5. Read and comprehend articles on the universe.

    6. Understand biologist point of view regarding world of living things.

    7. Demonstrate greater understanding of the human use of scientific knowledge.

    8. Develop college readiness skills such as textbook reading strategies, note taking, peer collaboration, and communication.

  
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    ABE 031 - ESL 5: Low Advanced

    10 Credits
    Designed for adults who have some proficiency in the English language. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills. ESL 5 is equivalent to CASAS scores 229-235.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This course is designed to serve ESL students who have completed Level 4 of the exit criteria or who demonstrate proficiency suitable for Level 5.
    Active Date 2014-04-25

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Entrance assessment of existing skill level. 2. Introduction to and mastery of Level 5 exit criteria and SLOs through class assignments, small group work, and lecture. 3. Exit assessment of existing skill level.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Determine the purpose and follow written directions to complete a task; be able to troubleshoot (identify mistakes in performance and try again) if necessary

    Use multiple reading strategies (including pre-reading tasks to activate prior knowledge, skimming, scanning, and using graphic organizers) to find the main ideas, supporting details, implied meaning, and cultural nuance (idioms, cultural knowledge); and decode new vocabulary words to find meaning

    Demonstrate knowledge of specialized words and abbreviations around community, job/career and college content using recognition of word forms in word families, and accurately predicting how to pronounce a word when read aloud

    Evaluate written texts for relevance, author bias and source reliability

    Use the writing process (determine the purpose and follow directions to complete a task; use multiple planning strategies (including activating prior knowledge) to brainstorm and organize ideas; produce a comprehensible draft; use several simple revision strategies with reference tools such as simplified dictionaries, writing rubrics, and grammar checklists to edit and get feedback from others; and produce a comprehensible final draft)

    Use complex vocabulary words about community, job/career and college content accurately and appropriately

    Use simple, compound and complex sentences while avoiding fragments and run-ons

    Develop well-constructed paragraphs in short essays (introductory paragraph with a thesis statement, two body paragraphs, and concluding paragraph) using different genres such as simple narrative, informative, summary, or expressive paragraphs with some attention to personal voice

    Synthesize and analyze multiple different sources in own words

    Determine the purpose for listening and follow spoken directions to complete a task

  
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    ABE 032 - ABE High School Health Science

    3 Credits
    Provides students with an understanding of the importance of lifestyle choices in preventing disease and improving quality of life. The knowledge and skills learned in this class will enable students to make informed personal health decisions and encourage them to take responsibility for their own health. This course fulfills .5 credits of health science for a high school diploma.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This course is designed to serve high school completion students.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    I. Dimensions of Health II. Behavior Change III. Psychosocial Health IV. Stress V. Healthy Relationships VI. Fertility Management VII. Addiction VIII. Licit and Illicit Drug Use IX. Alcohol, Tobacco, and Caffeine Use X. Cardiovascular Disease XI. Cancer XII. Infectious and Noninfectious Diseases XIII. Nutrition XIV. Weight Management XV. Personal Fitness XVI. Consumerism

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Students will be able to define the terms health and wellness, and describe various components.

    2. Students will be familiar with techniques for making behavior changes.

    3. Students will understand the importance of psychosocial health and how it affects relationships with others.

    4. Students will be aware of sources of stress and methods for managing stress.

    5. Students will be familiar with the characteristics of healthy relationships.

    6. Student will be familiar with methods of managing fertility.

    7. Students will have an understanding of the importance of nutrition and physical activity, and how it relates to managing a healthy body weight.

    8. Students will understand the process of addiction and be familiar with the most commonly abused substances.

    9. Students will be familiar with the processes of cardiovascular disease and cancer and how to reduce the risk of developing these diseases.

    10. Students will be able to identify the most common infectious and noninfectious diseases, and techniques for managing the risk of developing these diseases.

  
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    ABE 034 - Introduction to Theatre

    5 Credits
    Introduction to the theater with an emphasis on the collaborative components of live dramatic performance: playwriting, directing, design, acting and audience. Course includes required play attendance.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note Includes performance attendance.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve High school completion students who need to fulfill one credit of fine arts for their diploma. Students interested in drama, live performance & communication.
    Active Date 2015-12-04

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Foundations/Discussing Art 2. How Drama compares to other mediums of performance (Film, Television, Dance, etc.) 3. Functions of the Audience & Critics 4. Functions of the Director 5. Functions of the Actor 6. Functions of the Playwright 7. Dramatic Structure and Character 8. Functions of the Designer 9. Musical Theatre History & Current Trends

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate knowledge of the key components of dramatic performance and how they differ from other performance experiences.

    Demonstrate knowledge of the unique contributions of the collaborative artists that create drama.

    Analyze and assess live dramatic performance based on group expectations as well as personal aesthetics.

    Explore the history and current trends of theatre within diverse cultures.

  
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    ABE 035 - ABE High School Writing Skills

    5 Credits
    Designed for high school completion students who need work on language and rhetorical skills in order to prepare for ENGL 091. Focuses on writing multiparagraph responses and on constructing a variety of sentences with phrases and clauses in effective coordination and subordination. Also focuses on editing for problems related to diction (casual/formal), verb choice related to active/passive tense, agreement and precision and word choice issues, specifically related to precision, spelling and usage.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve ABE 035 is designed for high school completion students who need work on language and rhetorical skills in order to be prepared for English 091. The course fulfills one credit of English towards the high school diploma.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    For all sections: Rhetorical Issues: understanding assignments, invention strategies, topic sentences, supporting details, connections between paragraphs, coherence, patterns of thought, developing ideas. For sections offered to native speakers: Language Issues: proper diction depending on context, effective coordination and subordination, constructing effective, varied sentences; editing for sentence boundaries (specifically fragments and run-ons), verb tense, agreement and usage.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Common outcomes: Produce multi-paragraph responses to assignments on specific topics.

    Common outcomes: Develop paragraphs with clear focus, support and organization.

    Common outcomes:Effectively analyze and follow an instructor’s assignments/homework directions.

    Outcomes with native speaker focus: Construct effective sentences with independent and dependent clauses.

    Outcomes with native speaker focus: Refine use of coordination and subordination so that connections/conjunctions are logical.

    Outcomes with native speaker focus: Develop flexibility with diction in order to distinguish between informal/conversational and formal writing and use them appropriately.

    Outcomes with native speaker focus: Edit for sentence boundary problems, specifically related to run-ons and sentence fragments.

    Outcomes with native speaker focus: Edit for verb tense/verb form issues related to precision, accuracy, active and passive voice, and tense consistency.

    Outcomes with native speaker focus: Edit for word choice issues, specifically those related to precision, complexity and spelling/usage.

    Outcomes with nonnative speaker focus: Construct a variety of effective sentences using phrases and clauses correctly.

  
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    ABE 037 - ESL Math

    10 Credits
    To aid non-native English speakers who need instruction in numeracy skills. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities. ESL Math is equivalent to CASAS scores between 211-220.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have numeracy skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2015-03-06

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students improve their numeracy skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in a lecture format and group settings.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Read, write, and interpret some common types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers, monetary values and prices, benchmark fractions (3/4, 1/10), decimals (.25, .50, .75, .10) and percents (25%, 75%, 10%, 100%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: simple patterns, probability and proportions (1:4, 4:1); simple decimal/fraction conversions and equivalents.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: commonly used standard units of measurement, common geometric shapes, and the concept of “area”.
    Data/Statistics: simple ways to interpret and represent data (tables, bar graphs with and without gridlines, line graphs and pie graphs).

    Recall and use mathematical procedures such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, benchmark decimals and fractions (with or without use of calculator), grouping, comparing 2 numbers, and basic estimating; and measure length, weight, and areas of standard and non-standard shapes using tools calibrated with whole numbers and benchmark fraction and decimal equivalents (rulers, manipulatives). Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.

    Define, select, and organize simple data, and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.

    Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in pictures, or in writing.

    Use computer programs and/or internet to practice math.

    Use a Highline username and password to log on to campus computers.

  
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    ABE 040 - ABE College Preparation Reading I

    5 Credits
    Emphasis on reading for comprehension and vocabulary development. Topics include vocabulary, information literacy, and literal, inferential and critical level comprehension. Fulfills one credit of English towards a high school diploma.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve High school completion students who need to improve their reading and who test between 44-60 on the COMPASS Reading Test or 150-209 on the ESL COMPASS Reading Test.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    The course introduces students to the skills that will be used to analyze reading selections. Comprehension, vocabulary, study and information literacy strategies will be applied to a various assignments throughout the course.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words by using contextual information, affixes and etymology, and the dictionary and thesaurus.

    2. Apply literal and inferential comprehension skills on a variety of materials written at 8th-12th grade reading levels.

    3. Apply pre-reading strategies: previewing, skimming and questioning techniques.

    4. Apply reading strategies: comprehension strategies, and isolating & organizing key information with highlighting and note-taking.

    5. Apply post-reading strategies, including creation of study materials such as concept cards, Q & A, academic patterns charts, summary, outline, etc.

    6. Apply appropriate reading rates depending on purpose and difficulty of material.

    7. Interpret and draw conclusions from quantitative and graphical information.

    8. Locate and use textual, visual, and electronic resources for research and or to solve problems and make informed decisions.

    9. Develop awareness of individual strengths and weaknesses as learners.

  
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    ABE 041 - ABE College Preparation Reading III

    5 Credits
    Emphasis on developing academic reading skills across the disciplines. Students will work with text materials similar to those they encounter in college-level courses. Topics include SQ3R (a reading and study system), outlining, text marking, mapping and summarizing. Fulfills one credit of English towards a high school diploma.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve High school completion students who need to improve their reading and who test between 71-79 on the COMPASS Reading Test.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    The course introduces students to the skills that will be used to analyze reading selections. Comprehension, vocabulary, study and information literacy strategies will be applied to a various assignment throughout the course.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words by using contextual information, affixes and etymology, and the dictionary and thesaurus.

    2. Apply literal and inferential comprehension skills on a variety of materials written at 9th-13th grade reading levels.

    3. Apply pre-reading strategies: previewing, skimming and questioning techniques.

    4. Apply reading strategies: comprehension strategies, and isolating & organizing key information with highlighting and note-taking.

    5. Apply post-reading strategies: review techniques such as creation of study materials such as charts, concept cards, Q & A, academic patterns, summary and outline.

    6. Apply appropriate reading rates depending on purpose and difficulty of material.

    7. Interpret and draw conclusions from quantitative and graphical information.

    8. Locate and use textual, visual, and electronic resources for research and or to solve problems and make informed decisions.

    9. Develop awareness of individual strengths and weaknesses as learners.

  
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    ABE 043 - ABE College Preparation Reading II

    5 Credits
    Emphasis on reading for comprehension and vocabulary development. Topics of study include literal, inferential, and critical level comprehension; recall/study strategies; vocabulary; and information literacy.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve High school completion students who need to improve their reading and who test between 210-259 on the ESL COMPASS Reading Test or 61-70 on the COMPASS Reading Test or received a minimum of 2.0 in Read 71. Fulfills one credit of English towards a high school diploma.
    Active Date 2014-05-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    The course introduces students to the skills that will be used to analyze reading selections. Comprehension, study/recall, vocabulary and information literacy strategies will be applied to a variety of materials throughout the course.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words by using contextual information, affixes and etymology, and the dictionary and thesaurus.

    2. Apply literal and inferential comprehension skills on a variety of materials written at 8th-12th grade reading levels.

    3. Apply pre-reading strategies: previewing, skimming and questioning techniques.

    4. Apply reading strategies: comprehension strategies, and isolating & organizing key information with highlighting and note-taking.

    5. Apply post-reading strategies, including creation of study materials such as concept cards, Q & A, academic patterns charts, summary, outline, etc.

    6. Apply appropriate reading rates depending on purpose and difficulty of material.

    7. Interpret and draw conclusions from quantitative and graphical information.

    8. Locate and use textual, visual, and electronic resources for research and or to solve problems and make informed decisions.

    9. Develop awareness of individual strengths and weaknesses as learners.

  
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    ABE 051 - ABE Digital Literacy

    15 Credits


    Designed for current ABE students enrolled in an ABE course who want to increase their digital literacy skills. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills.


    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note For current ABE students, co-enrolled in another ABE course
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Designed to serve current ABE students enrolled in an ABE course who want to improve their digital literacy skills.
    Active Date 20170906T14:12:05

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-15
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 165
    Total Contact Hours 165
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    -Basic computer-related terminology

    -Communicate using email, CANVAS, discussion forums, and other formats.

    -Develop documents and upload documents

    -Use Microsoft Office programs such as Word, Excel, and PowerPoint

    -Navigate web sites

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Accurately use basic computer-related terminology in a variety of contexts

    Communicate in English with teacher and classmates using computer programs

    Correctly complete basic tasks using computer programs

    Navigate websites to access information and pictures

  
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    ABE 053 - ABE Parent-Family Education

    3 Credits
    Designed for parents of young children. Participation in parent education classes through a planned combination of methods in variable credit.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Parents and family members, community members.
    Active Date 2011-07-06

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 44
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Orientation to parent education in child care setting.
    2. Methods of child guidance.
    3. Self-esteem in parents and child/principles of growth and development in young children.
    4. Topics of special interest and concern to class members.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the significance of parent involvement.

    2. Recognize a parent’s role in providing for the physical needs of the family.

    3. Recognize and discuss the role of parenting in an ever changing and diverse world.

    4. State appropriate expectations for children at various age levels.

    5. Demonstrate an understanding of age-appropriate activities through interaction with young children.

    6. Practice and assess various methods in child guidance.

  
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    ABE 063 - ABE Math 5

    5 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in beginning algebraic skills in order to pass the GED tests, improve college math placement scores, or achieve other educational or career goals. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities.ABE Math level 5 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 236 and 245. 


    Pre-requisite(s)
    Department permission - CASAS score between 236-245.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve
    Students who have math skills below high school completion.

    Active Date 20170731T09:56:47

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Range 5-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course introduces and build on beginning algebraic skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in a lecture format and group settings. 


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Number Sense:  work with rational numbers in a variety of forms, and use equations to solve real-world problems involving ratio, rate, and proportion.

    Algebra:  generate and solve expressions and equations, including real-world scenarios and radicals, exponents, and linear equations

    Functions: define, evaluate, and compare functions to model relationships between quantities

    Geometry:  name geometric figures and be able to measure and calculate area, surface area, and volume and use the Pythagorean Theorem.

    Statistics and Probability: calculate mean, median, mode, range and absolute deviation.

  
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    ABE 064 - ABE Language Arts 5

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English skills in order to pass the GED tests, improve college math placement scores, or achieve other educational or careen goals. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 5 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 236 and 245.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have basic language skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Monitor comprehension and adjust reading strategies.

    Demonstrate familiarity with every day and some specialized content, vocabulary, paragraph structure and document organization.

    Determine the reading purpose. Select reading strategies appropriate to purpose.

    Activate prior knowledge to address reading purpose. Evaluate prior knowledge against new information to enhance understanding.

    Locate important information and determine missing information. Organize and analyze information and reflect on its underlying meaning using a range of strategies such as classification, categorization, and comparison/contrast. Evaluate and compare sources and evidence.

    Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing, and research and evaluate sources.

    Organize and present information to serve the purpose. Select from and use tools for overall planning and organization; outline, restate, summarize, and categorize ideas and produce a legible and comprehensible draft and typewritten and formatted final draft.

    Appropriately use a variety of sentence structures of medium length and coherently linked. Write detailed text with appropriate tone, language, and level of formality suitable for a variety of audiences.

    Use a variety of strategies to analyze and make simple revisions and solve problems in writing such as tone or voice to take into account the needs of the audience.

    Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to edit for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure and use appropriate tools such as dictionaries and online tools.

  
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    ABE 065 - ABE Integrated Skills 5

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English and math skills in order to pass the GED tests, improve college math placement scores, or achieve other educational or careen goals. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 5 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 236 and 245.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have basic language skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-05-27

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language and math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Monitor comprehension and adjust reading strategies.

    Demonstrate familiarity with every day and some specialized content, vocabulary, paragraph structure and document organization.

    Determine the reading purpose. Select reading strategies appropriate to purpose.

    Activate prior knowledge to address reading purpose. Evaluate prior knowledge against new information to enhance understanding.

    Locate important information and determine missing information. Organize and analyze information and reflect on its underlying meaning using a range of strategies such as classification, categorization, and comparison/contrast. Evaluate and compare sources and evidence.

    Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing, and research and evaluate sources.

    Organize and present information to serve the purpose. Select from and use tools for overall planning and organization; outline, restate, summarize, and categorize ideas and produce a legible and comprehensible draft and typewritten and formatted final draft.

    Appropriately use a variety of sentence structures of medium length and coherently linked. Write detailed text with appropriate tone, language, and level of formality suitable for a variety of audiences.

    Use a variety of strategies to analyze and make simple revisions and solve problems in writing such as tone or voice to take into account the needs of the audience.

    Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to edit for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure and use appropriate tools such as dictionaries and online tools.

  
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    ABE 066 - ABE Math 6

    5 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in algebraic skills in order to pass the GED tests, improve college math placement scores, or achieve other educational or career goals. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture and group activities. ABE Math level 6 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 246 and 255. 


    Pre-requisite(s) Department permission
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve
    Students who have math skills below high school completion.

    Active Date 20170731T09:56:45

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Range 5-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students improve their algebraic skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in a lecture format and group settings. 


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Numbers and Quantity:  use rational exponents and units of measurement

    Algebra:  interpret, manipulate, create, and reason with rational expressions, polynomials, equations, and inequalities

    Functions:  interpret, analyze, and build functions related to linear, quadratic, and exponential models.

    Geometry: define geometric terms and work with similarity, volume, and modeling

    Statistics: create and interpret data in graphic displays using two categorical and quantitative variables.

  
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    ABE 067 - ABE Integrated Skills 6

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English and math skills in order to pass the GED tests, improve college math placement scores, or achieve other educational or careen goals. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 6 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 246 and 255.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have basic language skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-05-27

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language and math skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Determine the reading purpose. Integrate it with prior knowledge to address reading purpose and develop deep understanding of information.

    Demonstrate familiarity with extensive specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with the organization of long, complex, prose and complex documents.

    Locate both directly stated and implied information using a wide range of strategies for long and academic texts. Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies.

    Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a wide range of strategies. Evaluate sources and effectiveness of argument.

    Determine the purpose for communicating.

    Organize and present information to serve the purpose. Select from a wide range of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; research and evaluate on-line sources; reproduce, synthesize, evaluate and draw sound conclusions from complex or extensive ideas; and produce a legible and comprehensive typewritten and properly formatted draft.

    Appropriately use everyday and specialized vocabulary in a variety of sentence structures in medium-length, well-sequenced, and detailed text with appropriate voice, tone, rhetorical forms, and style suitable for a variety of audiences.

    Choose from a variety of strategies to make multiple simple and holistic revisions during the writing process. Effectively seek out, describe, and work through holistic problems posed by the writing task such as re-sequencing text for clarity, adding evidence to support a logical argument, or change tone to accommodate audience.

    Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to make comprehensive edits for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure. Use appropriate editing tools as necessary.

    Submit work over the internet, such as e-mail attachment, dropbox, or in an on-line classroom.

  
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    ABE 068 - ABE Language Arts 6

    10 Credits
    To aid adults who need instruction in basic English skills in order to pass the GED tests, improve college math placement scores, or achieve other educational or careen goals. Instruction is delivered in a variety of formats including lecture, group activities, and individualized instruction. ABE Language Arts level 6 is equivalent to CASAS scores between 246 and 255.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have basic language skills below a high school level.
    Active Date 2014-05-27

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course is designed to help students strengthen their English language skills in order to achieve a wide range of career, educational, and personal goals. Content will be delivered in lecture and group formats.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Determine the reading purpose. Integrate it with prior knowledge to address reading purpose and develop deep understanding of information.

    Demonstrate familiarity with extensive specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with the organization of long, complex, prose and complex documents.

    Locate both directly stated and implied information using a wide range of strategies for long and academic texts. Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies.

    Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a wide range of strategies. Evaluate sources and effectiveness of argument.

    Determine the purpose for communicating.

    Organize and present information to serve the purpose. Select from a wide range of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; research and evaluate on-line sources; reproduce, synthesize, evaluate and draw sound conclusions from complex or extensive ideas; and produce a legible and comprehensive typewritten and properly formatted draft.

    Appropriately use everyday and specialized vocabulary in a variety of sentence structures in medium-length, well-sequenced, and detailed text with appropriate voice, tone, rhetorical forms, and style suitable for a variety of audiences.

    Choose from a variety of strategies to make multiple simple and holistic revisions during the writing process. Effectively seek out, describe, and work through holistic problems posed by the writing task such as re-sequencing text for clarity, adding evidence to support a logical argument, or change tone to accommodate audience.

    Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to make comprehensive edits for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure. Use appropriate editing tools as necessary.

    Submit work over the internet, such as e-mail attachment, dropbox, or in an on-line classroom.

  
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    ABE 069 - ABE HS21+ English 4

    5 Credits
    Reviews the fundamentals of English sentence structure, usage and punctuation and provides practice in these areas. Students study and practice writing paragraphs and essays, achieving unity and developing ideas that are clearly and concisely expressed in topic and thesis sentences. Students who pass five credits of ABE 069 with a 2.0 or better will earn credit towards their high school diploma.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve HS21+ students who need to complete their English credits for their high school diploma and who desire to improve their writing and editing skills in order to prepare for college level writing.
    Active Date 2015-12-04

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Students will move through brainstorming and pre-writing to drafting, revising, editing and proofreading a variety of paragraphs and essays. Out-of-class essay(s) combine with an in-class writing piece and self assessment to form the final portfolio.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Write 2-3 page essays that are focused, organized and supported

    Edit their writing successfully using the rules of grammar and punctuation of Standard Edited English.

    Write paragraphs and essays that utilize a variety of thinking/writing skills toward specific purposes such as description, summary, narration, analysis, among others.

    Respond critically and constructively to the essays of published writers and fellow students.

    Summarize a piece of reading and respond to it in writing.

    Successfully apply ideas and strategies from course readings in their own essays.

    Work productively with other students in collaborative groups to discuss readings and review each other’s papers.

    Define and avoid plagiarism by distinguishing their own words from those of sources.

    Write paragraphs and essays that utilize a variety of thinking/writing skills toward specific purposes such as description, summary, narration, analysis, among others.

    Successfully revise their rough drafts with an understanding of focus, organization and support.

  
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    ABE 070 - ABE/ESL Technology Lab

    1 Credits
    This course is designed for students needing help with English language skills such as pronunciation, reading, and writing to prepare for th e healthcare workforce with an emphasis on pronunciation in a healthcare setting. The purpose of this course is to improve language learning strategies, increase proficiency with technology, improve retention an d persistence using a variety of software and online resources. Students will be assessed and placed in appropriate class levels towards the end of the course if applicable. Students will also be referred to appropriate programs and services.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Non-native English speakers preparing for entry in a healthcare pathway class, healthcare training program or healthcare workforce.
    Active Date 2011-07-06

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 75
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This course focuses on these areas: I. Basic computer literacy in context of ESL II. English language skills: reading, writing, pronunciation III. Communication and pronunciation in the context of healthcare IV. Goal setting V. Learning Strategies

    Student Learning Outcomes
    By the end of the course the successful student will be able to: 1. State and revise short and long term goals.

    2. Monitor and evaluate his/her own progress.

    3. Develop and write a Personal Action Plan Outlining steps and skills he/she needs to reach his/her employment goals.

    4. Correctly pronounce key vocabulary.

  
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    ABE 071 - ABE Review of Arithmetic

    5 Credits
    Designed for students needing to review the meaning of and methods for calculating with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratios, percents, and proportions. To earn credit for the course, students will have to pass mastery tests in four areas: whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and percents/proportions.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note This course is designed for students needing a review of fractions, decimals, percents and proportions.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve ABE students needing arithmetic.
    Active Date 2015-11-18

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Throughout the course, incorporate realistic applications. Begin with a brief summary of whole number arithmetic, including order of operations. The majority of the course should be focused on concepts and techniques of -fraction arithmetic -decimal arithmetic -ratios, percents and proportions

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Add, subtract, multiply, and divide whole numbers.

    Read, represent, add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals.

    Read, represent, add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions.

    Read, represent, and compute with ratios, percentages, and proportions.

    Use the correct order of operations in performing arithmetic calculations.

    Solve realistic problems involving arithmetic.

    Demonstrate mastery of essential concepts and procedures related to whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents/proportions on a timed exam to be eligible for passing the course.

  
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    ABE 081 - ABE Introduction to Algebra

    5 Credits
    A beginning algebra course that develops proficiency in fraction and signed number arithmetic, evaluation of expressions, and solving linear equations in one variable.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve High school completion students needing a first algebra course. Fulfills one credit of Math towards a high school diploma.
    Active Date 2014-09-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Arithmetic of fractions and signed numbers - Area and perimeter of circles, triangles, and rectangles and volume of boxes - Pie, bar and line graphs - Summarizing data sets using mean, median, mode, the five-number summary, and histograms or box plots. - Evaluation and simplification of expressions - Polynomial addition, subtraction, and multiplication. - Solving linear equations up to the level of ax + b = cx + d - Emphasis on applying concepts and skills learned to relationships and formulas in everyday life and other college coursework - Emphasis on developing quantitative reasoning ability and symbolic reasoning ability

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Describe the meaning of and compute efficiently by hand with basic fractions and signed numbers.

    Use proportions to perform unit conversions.

    Describe the meaning of and compute dimensions, perimeters, and areas of triangles, circles, and rectangles, and volume of boxes.

    Construct and interpret pie, bar, and line graphs as well as be able to interpret most “newspaper-type” graphs.

    Simplify and evaluate a variety of expressions, including polynomials.

    Solve linear equations in one variable up to the level of ax + b = cx + d.

    Describe and use available resources to be successful in math classes.

    Identify the goal and relevant information given in a question or task, then describe some of the steps necessary to complete the task.

    Describe her/his reasoning on a task, including sources of confusion or errors.

    Demonstrate mastery of essential concepts and procedures related to signed number arithmetic and order of operations, and solving linear equations on a timed exam to be eligible for passing the course.

  
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    ABE 086 - ABE Essentials of Geometry

    5 Credits
    A geometry course that examines important properties of 2-D and 3-D shapes, including area, volume, congruence, similarity, constructions, transformations, and trigonometry. The course emphasizes using inductive and deductive reasoning to make claims and establish their validity.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who need to earn credit for a high school geometry course, or who would like a review of fundamental concepts of 2-D and 3-D geometry.
    Active Date 2014-05-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Topics may vary slightly, but will include the following: * Right-triangle trigonometry - define and compute both distances and angles in realistic situations * Lines and angles - notation, definitions, line and angle relationships, the Pythagorean Theorem; begin practicing reasoning inductively and deductively * Geometric constructions - manually copy, bisect, create parallel and perpendicular lines, build shapes, explore properties of shapes using technology, continue hypothesizing and justifying * Congruence and similarity - define, verify, and solve problems using congruence or similarity of triangles * Geometric proof - justify properties of lines, angles, and shapes arising earlier in the course * Coordinate geometry - revisit concepts of position, distance, angles (slope), midpoints, collinearity, parallelism, and perpendicularity using coordinates and basic algebra * Transformations - perform translations, reflections, and some rotations, then describe the effects of translations and reflections on coordinates of points. * Analyze 3-D shapes - classify and represent basic 3-D shapes; define, justify formulas for, and calculate surface area and volume; and empirically verify pi.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    State, justify, and use theorems about angles - especially about angles formed when parallel lines are intersected by a transversal.

    State, justify, and use the Pythagorean Theorem to solve problems.

    Define triangle congruence and similarity and use them to determine if triangles are congruent or similar, as well as to solve real-world problems.

    Perform geometric constructions by hand and using geometry software.

    Describe and compute locations, distances, and directions using coordinates and algebra.

    Define and apply basic isometries to 2-D shapes.

    Define and solve problems involving the basic trigonometric ratios of sine, cosine, tangent, and their inverses.

    Define, compare, and represent prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones, and spheres.

    Define, justify, and compute with formulas for surface area and volume.

    Inductively generate conjectures and either support them deductively or refute them with counterexamples.

  
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    ABE 090 - Transition to College

    10 Credits
    Designed for ESL students before entering a vocational or academic program. Students receive an orientation to the college as well as academic skills and English language skills needed for successful transition and participation in higher education.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This class is designed for ESL students before entering a vocational or academic program.
    Active Date 2011-09-21

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-10
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Proficiencies include: 1) A knowledge and understanding of how the system works and counts; 2) Competence in reading and writing; 3) Competence in oral skills (speaking and understanding) and 4) Effective learning strategies.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Apply different reading strategies depending on purpose.

    2. Develop basic academic writing skills.

    3. Communicate effectively orally based on purpose and needs.

    4. Improve listening skills

    5. Develop effective learning strategies.

    6. Access community college resources

  
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    ABE 091 - ABE Essentials of Intermediate Algebra

    5 Credits
    An intermediate algebra course that develops understanding of functions (linear, exponential, quadratic) as well as proficiency with simplifying expressions involving integer exponents, solving linear inequalities, and solving linear equations in two variables. GRAPHING CALCULATOR REQUIRED: TI-83 or 84 recommended.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve High school completion students needing algebraic skills such as graphing formulas, using and analyzing function relationships. Fulfills one credit of Math towards a high school diploma.
    Active Date 2014-05-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    * Solving linear equations in one variable having many terms, fractional coefficients, and distributing * Solving linear inequalities in one variable, and expressing results with graphs and interval notation * Concept and notation of functions, domain, and range, including exposure to absolute value and piecewise functions * Features of functions (max/min, increasing/decreasing, positive/negative, intercepts, rates of change), including using compound inequalities and interval notation to describe them * Linear functions (concept, intercepts, slope, slope-intercept form, constructing from pairs of points, linear regression) * Solving systems of equations in two variables by graphical estimation and the elimination method * Exponential functions (concept, intercepts, asymptotes) * Simplifying expressions involving integer exponents * Division of polynomials by monomials. * Quadratic functions (concept, constructing graphs using intercepts, vertex, and concavity, finding intercepts using the quadratic formula) * The Pythagorean Theorem and distance formulas, including estimating and computing roots of numbers * Emphasis on applying concepts and skills learned to situations in everyday life and other college coursework * Emphasis on developing quantitative reasoning ability and symbolic reasoning ability * Training in use of graphing calculator throughout course to evaluate, graph, trace, zoom, change window, and perform regression

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Complete a variety of algebraic tasks, including calculating with radicals, simplifying exponential expressions, and solving linear equations, inequalities, and systems of linear equations.

    Define the concepts of function, domain, and range, then compute and describe features of several function types.

    Define and identify slope, intercepts, and slope-intercept form, then use them to describe and construct linear equations and graphs for realistic situations.

    Define and describe the features of exponential functions, then apply them to realistic situations.

    Define quadratic functions, then compute features of their graphs and solve quadratic equations.

    Describe her/his level of understanding before a formal assessment as well as steps she/he will take to improve.

    Describe and consistently apply an effective strategy for solving problems.

    Use formal terminology to describe his/her reasoning on a task as well as patterns in his/her errors.

    Demonstrate mastery of essential concepts and procedures related to functions and lines on a timed exam to be eligible for passing the course.

  
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    ABE 098 - HS Culminating Project

    2 Credits
    This course meets the Washington State high school completion requirement for graduation. Students will explore a topic of interest and complete one of the following: essay, oral presentation, service learning project. Students will create a High School and Beyond Plan.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students enrolled in Highline’s High School Completion Program.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 35
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 70
    Total Contact Hours 70
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Independent Study.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to think analytically, logically and creatively and to integrate experience and knowledge to solve problems.

    2. Demonstrate mastery of English in a variety of ways, effectively and concisely.

    3. Apply learning in a real world way.

    4. Demonstrate career readiness.

  
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    ABE P 002 - ESL Pre-Literate

    10 Credits
     

    Designed for adults who have little to no literacy in their native language and who have extremely limited proficiency in the English language. Integrates the instruction of listening, speaking, reading, writing and technology skills. ESL 1 is equivalent to CASAS scores 180 and below.


    Fees 

    Designed to Serve  

    This course is designed to serve ESL students whose English proficiency is at the pre-literacy level.

    Active Date 20170809T16:41:38

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Range 5-12
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 110
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Entrance assessment of existing skill level. 
    2. Introduction to and mastery of Level Pre-Literacy Exit criteria and SLOs through class assignments, small group work and lecture.
    3. Exit assessment of existing skill level. 


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate the ability to speak with a partner following provided prompts

    Demonstrate the ability to speak clearly in front of class

    Demonstrate ability to read a variety of emergent level texts by completing comprehension activities

    Identify evidence within text to accurately answer questions

    Demonstrate emergent writer skills based on foundational conventions of written English


American Ethnic and Identity Studies

  
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    AEIS 136 - African-American Roots

    5 Credits
    Traces the social development of significant issues in the lives of black people in the U.S. through the civil-rights movement, including the legacy of slavery, family relations, gender construction, the role of religion, methods of resistance, the impact of segregation, political movements, the struggle for civil rights and the importance of cultural expression.

    Course Note Previously CGG 136, & DGS 136
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students.  Satisfies diversity and globalism requirement
    Active Date 20170530T16:33:14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area I
    Course Outline
    • Political economy of slavery
    • Gender construction
    • Family & social life
    • Religion and resistance
    • Expressive culture
    • Racism and repression
    • Intellectual life
    • The politics of resistance and rebellion.


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Apply communication & conflict resolution skills to contemporary issues.

    Critically analyze and evaluate racial and ethnic issues in historical context.

    Explain connections between African-social and cultural traditions and African American cultural & social formations.

    Describe effect of world system on U.S. demographics & economy.

    Explain the relationship of African Americans to the formation of multicultural American society.

    Explain the relationship of slavery and resistance activities on American culture & political pluralism.

  
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    AEIS 137 - African-American Experience

    5 Credits
    Surveys changes in African-American culture and society in the post-Black Social Movement (BSM). Examination of Vietnam War on African-American society; economic and cultural changes in post-BSM African-American society; and contemporary issues in African-American culture: colorism; multiracial identity construction; hip-hop and other expressive culture formations; aesthetics and identity construction; gender relations; intergroup relations; African-Americans in the world system; changing U.S. demographics; and AIDS.

    Course Note Previously CGG 137 & DGS137
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students.  Satisfies DGS requirement.
    Active Date 20170530T16:33:17

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area I
    Course Outline
    • National retrenchment, internal consolidation
    • African American Social institutions, issues of leadership
    • Inter- and intra group affiliations and conflicts
    • Language, aesthetics and expressive culture
    • Crossings and criss-crossings; African Americans in a global economy.


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze changes in African American identity construction.

    Analyze changes in African American language & expressive culture.

    Analyze changes in inter- & intra-group relations since Black Social Movement.

    Apply communication & conflict resolution skills to contemporary issues.

    Explain the effects of the world system on U.S. demographics & economy.

    Discuss post-Black Social Movement changes in African American in society & culture.

  
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    AEIS 142 - Asian-American Roots

    5 Credits
    Introduces an interdisciplinary examination of the Asian immigrant and Asian-American experience through World War II. Examines the idea of the American, U.S. labor and immigration practices, exclusionary laws, citizenship, generational conflict and cultural kinship, identity formation, inter- and intra-group issues, the Hawaiian experience, the Japanese-American incarceration, gender issues, and issues of race and representation.

    Course Note Previously CGG 205 and DGS 140.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students.  Meets the diversity and globalism degree requirement.
    Active Date 20170601T14:04:36

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area I
    Course Outline
    1. The Hawai’ian experience (plantations, labor, formation of local )
    2. U.S. labor and immigration practices
    3. Early Chinese immigration (railroad, Chinatowns, gender issues, stereotypes, exclusion)
    4. Early Japanese immigration (issei, picture brides, nisei, exclusion)
    5. Early Korean immigration (exiles, ethnic antagonism)
    6. Early Asian Indian immigration (migrant labor, bachelor society)
    7. Early Filipino immigration (migrant labor, bachelor society, anti-miscegenation, labor unions)
    8. The Japanese American incarceration during World War II (Pearl Harbor, war hysteria, interment, aftermath)
    9. Disparate Asian American ethnic groups (ethnic antagonism, ethnic enclaves)


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Critically analyze and evaluate racial and ethnic issues in historical context.

    Demonstrate an understanding of early Asian American experiences and issues within a historical, social, cultural, and artistic context.

    Identify and articulate how topics in Asian American Studies are relevant to our understanding of personal experience, observations, and the world around us.

    Identify and explain the formation and emergence of early Asian American cultural and political identities.

    Describe the relationship of Asian Americans to the formation of multicultural American society.

  
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    AEIS 143 - Asian-American Experience: Post-WW II

    5 Credits
    Introduces an interdisciplinary examination of contemporary issues in the Asia-American experience. Examines the development of pan-Asian-American social, political and cultural movements following the Japanese-American incarceration and the 1965 Immigration Act; the model minority myth; U.S. labor and immigration practices; anti-Asian violence; general conflict; the contemporary Hawaiian experience; gender issues; hapas; and media and issues of race and representation.

    Course Note Previously CGG 206, DGS 206, and DGS 141.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students.  Meets diversity and globalism degree requirements.
    Active Date 20170601T14:04:37

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area I
    Course Outline
    1.  Pan-Asian American movement (identity, post-internment, Civil Rights Movement)
    2. Model Minority Myth (origin, problems, stereotypes)
    3. U.S. labor and immigration practices (1965 Immigration Act, Korean War and VietNam War refugees)
    4. Generational conflict (first wave vs. second wave, first generation vs. second generation, 1.5 generation)
    5. Anti-Asian violence (Asian enemy, Vincent Chin, L.A. Riots)
    6. African American and Asian Americans (L.A. Riots, media/cultural appropriation)
    7. Contemporary Hawai’ian experience (politics, majority, local
    8. Gender issues (fetishism of the Asian female, effeminism of the Asian male, sexuality)
    9. Hapas ( disapperaring Japanese American, identity, community)
    10. Issues of race and representation (stereotypes, media images/portrayals, appropriation/authenticity)


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Critically analyze and evaluate racial and ethnic issues in historical context.

    Demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of the contemporary Asian American experience within a historical, social, cultural, and artistic context.

    Identify and articulate how the Asian American contemporary experience is relevant to our understanding of personal experience, observations, and the world around us.

    Describe the formation and emergence of Asian American and pan-Asian American cultural and political identities.

    Describe the relationship of Asian Americans to the formation of multicultural American society.

  
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    AEIS 150 - The Latino Experience

    5 Credits
    Introduces an interdisciplinary examination of the Latino experience in the United States. Topics include Latino ethnicity and identity formation; culture; racial and gender relations; socioeconomic and labor issues; immigration; language; and representation.

    Course Note Previously CGG175, DGS175 and DGS150
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students.  Meets diversity and globalism degree requirement.
    Active Date 20170530T16:33:18

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area I
    Course Outline
    1. Historical background of U.S./Latin American relations
    2. Evolution Latino ethnicity, identity and culture
    3. Immigration and the formation of Latino communities
    4. Language issues
    5. Socioeconomic and labor issues
    6. Discrimination, segregation and bias in contemporary America
    7. Racial and gender relations
    8. Social construction of stereotypes
    9. The Border in the 21st century.


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze, contrast, and synthesize the diverse values and experiences of Latinos in the U.S.

    Apply the critical thinking skills developed in the course to their own experience.

    Identify and employ critical stances and modes of inquiry.

    Participate in public discourse about culture, gender, race, class, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and other socially defined sources of identity with self-conviction and respect for others.

    Analyze the ways in which specific images and stereotypes of Latinos have been created and perpetuated in U.S. society through a variety of media forms, including but not limited to art, television, films, and literary works.

    Describe the ways stereotypes are internalized and/or resisted in both Latino and U.S. culture.

  
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    AEIS 156 - Northwest Native Peoples

    5 Credits
    Introduces an interdisciplinary survey of the traditions and cultures of Indian tribes of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska native peoples. Study of the Northwest and Alaska native peoples’ history, literature, economic pursuits, music, film and indigenous languages. Particular emphasis on the Northwest and Alaska native peoples’ historical static relationships with local, city, county, state and federal governments as well as with other Northwest tribes.

    Course Note Previously CGG 156 and DGS 156
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students.  Meets diversity and globalism degree requirement.
    Active Date 20170530T16:33:20

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area I
    Course Outline
    1. Historical and geographic differences of NW and Alaska Native peoples at the time of discovery by European peoples and a look at how the past has influenced and changed the Native peoples’ land and culture today.
    2. Historical accounts and stories that have affected Native American and non-Native views on the discovery of the NW coast and Alaska.
    3. Identity of NW Indians and Alaska Natives and relationship to the land and sea. A look at contemporary NW and Alaska Native individuals who have influenced change and assisted tribal and Alaska Natives entities challenge non-tribal encroachment on their lands.
    4. Northwest Indian and Alaska Native country today and how acculturation, assimilation, education, economic development, cultural resistance, and change in the 21st century have influenced change in tribal entities.
    5. The reincarnation of NW and Alaska languages and traditions to instill the continuous Native identity and the sacred relationship to the land and sea.
    6. Contemporary political, economic and cultural issues facing the NW coast Indians and Alaska Natives.


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze, contrast, and synthesize the diverse values and experiences of Northwest and Alaska Native Peoples in the U.S..

    Apply the critical thinking skills developed in the course to their own experience.

    Identify and employ critical stances and modes of inquiry.

    Participate in public discourse about culture, gender, race, class, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and other socially defined sources of identity with self-conviction and respect for others.

    Recognize the formation and emergence of the cultural and political identities of Northwest and Alaska Native Peoples.

  
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    AEIS 172 - The Queer Experience

    5 Credits
    Introduces an interdisciplinary examination of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) experience within the United States and abroad. Topics include LGBT psychology, history, politics, literature/art, and mass media.

    Course Note Previously DGS 172
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students who wish to gain a broader understanding of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender experience within the context of the United States and globally.
    Active Date 2015-10-30

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area II
    Course Outline
    1. Sex, Gender, & Sexual Orientation
    2. Development of Sexual Orientation
    3. Prejudice & Discrimination
    4. Sexual Orientation, Race, & Ethnicity
    5. LGBT Health
    6. Coming Out & Identity Development
    7. LGBT Relationships
    8. LGBT Parenting & Family
    9. LGBT Aging
    10. LGBT History
    11. LGBT Politics
    12. LGBT Literature, Art, & Media

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Critically analyze course material as it relates to personal experience and the experience of others.

    Recognize the relationship between sex, gender, and sexual orientation.

    Describe the impact of homophobia and heterosexism on society as a whole.

    Evaluate the current state of research as it relates to the queer experience.

    Identify and articulate LGBT representation in history, politics, art, literature, and the media.

    Understand the queer experience within various cultures and groups.

  
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    AEIS 210 - Women and Society

    5 Credits
    Introduces women’s studies with a focus on women’s social, creative, economic and political lives. Interdisciplinary analysis of social construction and enforcement of gender differences and inequalities. Examines how the intersection of gender, race, class, nationality and culture shape women’s experiences. Topics may include women’s rights, education, health and body images, as well as violence against women, feminist theory, media messages, popular culture, racism, sexual identities and activism in a global context. May be taught thematically.

    Course Note Previously DGS 210.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students.
    Active Date 2014-11-12

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area I
    Course Outline
    Analysis of social construction of gender differences and gender inequalities in contexts determined by instructor. Study of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and nationality in the lives of women. Overview of feminist scholarship regarding gender, gender differences and gender inequalities. Impact of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and nationality on gender. Focus on special topics, which may include, but are not limited to, feminist theory, reproduction and motherhood, popular culture, sexual autonomy, racism, lesbian identities and activism in a global context.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze the intersection of social identities, particularly of oppressed identities, as it affects the diversity of human experiences.

    Apply concepts of the course to their own experience and to articulate their own roles in terms of the intersections of social identities.

    Identify how gender, race, class and other cultural factors shape social identity and experience.

    Identify similarities and differences in the varieties of American women’s experiences and those of women in other countries.

    Recognize and articulate contemporary principles and issues of feminist/womanist thought.

    Recognize and articulate personal and political action that challenges sexism, racism, classism, and patterns of social dominance of all kinds.

    Recognize and explain the diverse nature of the American woman’s movement and some of the similarities and differences in women’s movements in other countries.

    Recognize multiple aspects of identity expressed in women’s writings, art, and culture.

    Recognize women both as individuals and as members of a socio-economic-poltical group with common concerns and challenges.


American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 291 - Special Studies

    1 Credits
    Exploration of deaf-blind community.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students wishing to do extended studies into the Deaf-Blind community.
    Active Date 2012-11-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Class Limit 9
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 55
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Students will fill out contract with instructor that specifies the objectives, the activities, the estimated work hours, the product and the method of evaluation for the proposed study. (contract forms are available in building 5 and in the Dean of Instructions office.)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate extended depth of knowledge of Deaf-Blind community

  
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    ASL 292 - Special Studies

    2 Credits
    Exploration of deaf-blind community.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students wishing to do extended studies into the Deaf-Blind community.
    Active Date 2012-11-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-2
    Class Limit 9
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 55
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Students will fill out contract with instructor that specifies the objectives, the activities, the estimated work hours, the product and the method of evaluation for the proposed study. (contract forms are available in building 5 and in the Dean of Instructions office.)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate extended depth of knowledge of Deaf-Blind community

  
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    ASL 293 - Special Studies

    3 Credits
    Exploration of deaf-blind community.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students wishing to do extended studies into the Deaf-Blind community.
    Active Date 2011-08-08

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Class Limit 9
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 110
    Total Contact Hours 121
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    Students will fill out contract with instructor that specifies the objectives, the activities, the estimated work hours, the product and the method of evaluation for the proposed study. (contract forms are available in building 5 and in the Dean of Instructions office.)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate extended depth of knowledge of Deaf-Blind community

  
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    ASL 294 - Special Studies

    4 Credits
    Exploration of deaf-blind community.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students wishing to do extended studies into the Deaf-Blind community.
    Active Date 2011-08-08

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-4
    Class Limit 9
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 165
    Total Contact Hours 176
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    Students will fill out contract with instructor that specifies the objectives, the activities, the estimated work hours, the product and the method of evaluation for the proposed study. (contract forms are available in building 5 and in the Dean of Instructions office.)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate extended depth of knowledge of Deaf-Blind community

  
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    ASL 295 - Special Studies

    5 Credits
    Exploration of deaf-blind community.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students wishing to do extended studies into the Deaf-Blind community.
    Active Date 2011-08-08

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Class Limit 9
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 220
    Total Contact Hours 231
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    Students will fill out contract with instructor that specifies the objectives, the activities, the estimated work hours, the product and the method of evaluation for the proposed study. (contract forms are available in building 5 and in the Dean of Instructions office.)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate extended depth of knowledge of Deaf-Blind community

  
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    ASL& 121 - American Sign Language I

    5 Credits
    ASL& 121 is a comprehensive beginning course in American Sign Language, which includes instruction and practice in expressive and receptive language skills and an introduction to the culture and history of the primary users of the language.

    Course Note Previously ASL 101.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement. Students interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2015-02-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    400 core supplemental vocabulary Manual alphabet, plus numbers 1-100 Parameters of signs Sign glosses Classifiers: pronominal, and size and shape specifiers Lexicalized fingerspelling Hand dominance Personal, possessive and plural pronouns Noun-verb pairs Topicalized sentences, yes/no and wh questions Signer’s perspective vs. real world orientation ASL timeline and time-indicators Spatial agreement and contrastive structures American Deaf History, culture and education Community contact hours

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students demonstrate an expressive (manual) proficiency in ASL with emphases on clear articulation of the parameters of signs.

    Students demonstrate a receptive (visual comprehension) of ASL.

    Students demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structure.

    Students demonstrate an understanding of American Deaf culture and its relationship to mainstream English-hearing and speaking U.S. culture.

  
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    ASL& 122 - American Sign Language II

    5 Credits
    ASL& 122 is a comprehensive, second level beginning course in American Sign Language, which includes instruction and practice in expressive and receptive language skills and continued cultural exploration.

    Pre-requisite(s) ASL& 121 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously ASL 102.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement; students interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2015-02-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    400 core supplemental vocabulary additional to ASL& 121 Numbers 1-1 million Money Basic Math Incorporate numbers into age, time, money and pronominal signs Plain/non-directional verbs and inflecting/directional verbs Object-subject-verb and subject-verb-object sentence structures Rhetorical questions and conditional sentences American Deaf history, culture and education Community contact hours

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students demonstrate expressive (manual) proficiency in ASL with emphasis on clear articulation of the parameters of signs.

    Students demonstrate receptive (visual comprehension) proficiency in ASL.

    Students demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structure.

    Students demonstrate an understanding of American Deaf culture and its relationship to mainstream English-hearing and speaking U.S. culture.

  
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    ASL& 123 - American Sign Language III

    5 Credits
    ASL& 123 is a comprehensive third level beginning course in American Sign Language, which includes instruction and practice in expressive and receptive language skills, continued cultural exploration and an introduction to the deaf-blind culture and community.

    Pre-requisite(s) ASL& 122 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously ASL 103.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement; students needing Humanities distribution credits; students interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2011-08-08

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    400 core supplemental vocabulary additional to ASL& 121 and 122 Common idioms and expressions Inflect sign intensity and character Temporal and distributional aspects Conjunctions and relative clauses American Deaf history, culture and education History of Ushers Syndrome Deaf-Blindness in the U.S. Community contact hours with Deaf/Deaf-Blind communities

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students demonstrate expressive (manual) proficiency in ASL with emphasis on clear articulation of the parameters of signs

    Students demonstrate receptive (visual comprehension) proficiency in ASL

    Students demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structure

    Students demonstrate an understanding of American Deaf culture and its relationship to mainstream English-hearing and speaking U.S. culture

    Students demonstrate an understanding of Deaf-Blind culture and an ability to tactilely communicate with and guide Deaf-Blind individuals


Anthropology

  
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    ANTH& 100 - Survey of Anthropology

    5 Credits
    Teaches various aspects of the human species, including evolutionary and cultural adaptation and diversity, prehistoric cultures and linguistics.

    Course Note Previously ANTHR 100.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve College transfer students interested in holistic examination of humankind across space and over time.
    Active Date 2013-01-10

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science Area II
    Course Outline
    1) Nature and scope of anthropology 2) Human biology as adaption: heredity, variation, population genetics and evolutionary mechanisms 3) Primate evolution & behavior 4) Material culture: archaeological theory & methods 5) Sociocultural adaptions and conceptual frameworks for understanding them 6) Contemporary societies 7) Theories of culture change and the future

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate a knowledge of the interacting processes of biological and cultural evolution which result in modern humans and contemporary cultures.

    Be familiar with the evidence for human evolution through study of the fossil record.

    Develop a conceptual basis for analysis of the diverse cultures extant in the world.

    Develop an understanding of the evolutionary and ecological framework of human biological and sociocultural development.

    Posses a holistic perspective on the full range of human diversity through time and across geographic space.

  
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    ANTH& 104 - World Prehistory

    5 Credits
    Surveys human prehistory from just prior to domestication of plants and animals through the emergence of early civilizations. Special emphasis on the manner in which this information is obtained from the archaeological record. Discusses Mesopotamia, China, Egypt, Indus Valley, sub-Saharan Africa, and other Old World cultures; Oceania; Peru, Mesoamerica, and other New World cultures.

    Course Note Previously ANTHR 105.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students interested in origins and evolution of cultures around the world.
    Active Date 2014-11-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Social Science Area II
    Course Outline
    Evolution and Description of Old World Cultures from the Origin of Agriculture through Ancient Civilizations Evolution and Description of New World and Pacific Cultures from the Origin of Agriculture through Ancient Civilizations

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural evolution of humans throughout the inhabited world.

    Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural diversity of past peoples via group presentations and research papers

    Demonstrate an understanding of the patterns of cultural change from the transition of foraging societies to the advent of civilizations.

  
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    ANTH& 204 - Archaeology

    5 Credits
    Studies the various ways in which archaeologists interpret material remains. Examines a variety of interdisciplinary approaches which are utilized in the attempt to reconstruct past life, events, and cultures. Explores the historical development of archaeology and related disciplines in order to assess their explanatory potential and limitations.

    Course Note Previously ANTHR 220.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve College transfer students interested the methods of retrieving information concerning past human societies.
    Active Date 2014-10-27

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Social Science Area II
    Course Outline
    Review of the history and development of the field of archaeology Methods and procedures for the conducting of background research, survey, and testing design of archaeological sites Material recovery and processing techniques from an archaeological site Quantitative analysis of material recovered from an archaeological site Dating techniques relevant to archaeological sites Multidisciplinary approach of archaeology

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Develop a clear understanding of the strengths and limitations of methods utilized to reconstruct or otherwise interpret the past.

    Gain an appreciation of the ways in which the study of the past can provide a clearer understanding of the present.

    Analyze archaeological material and express results in a detailed report format.

    Learn where and how to set up an archaeological site.

  
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    ANTH& 205 - Biological Anthropology

    5 Credits
    Examines the history and theories of evolution. Discusses the causes and distribution of human physical variation, the concept of race, and racism in science. Presents the subfield of Forensic Anthropology or the analysis of human remains. Examines the anatomical and behavioral differences and similarities of non-human primates and humans. Traces the fossil record of the earliest species of primates, prosimians, monkeys, apes, and humans.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve General student (non-major) as well as students needing credits in the biological sciences.
    Active Date 2014-11-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Science
    Course Outline
    History and Theory of Evolution - Pre-Darwinian Notions of Biological Variation - Development of Modern Biological & Earth Sciences - Taxonomy - Lamarckian Evolution - Charles Darwin - Natural, Sexual, & Artificial Selection - Genetics - Population Genetics Human Variation - Human Polymorphisms - Racism in Science - Concept of Race - Morphological Variation in Humans Forensic Anthropology - Methods & Procedures Primates - Anatomical & Behavioral Traits of Prosimians, Monkeys, Apes, & Humans Paleoanthropology - Primate Evolution - Early Hominids - Modern Humans

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate an understanding of the processes of evolution.

    Develop an understanding of the processes of evolution to analyze and explain the human fossil record.

    Interpret and explain modern human physical variation within the context of evolutionary theory.

    Provide anatomical and genetic explanations for placing humans within the Order Primates.

    Utilize proper methods and procedures for the analysis of human skeletal remains.

  
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    ANTH& 206 - Cultural Anthropology

    5 Credits
    Introduces theories and methods used to understand the cultures and societies of non-Western and Western peoples. Comparative emphasis includes examination of political, religious, kinship and language systems.

    Course Note Previously ANTHR 202.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve College transfer students interested in holistic examination of cultural diversity of various societies from around the world.
    Active Date 2013-01-10

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Social Science area II ProfTech Human Relations
    Course Outline
    The nature of cultural anthropology: history, methodology, subdisciplines The nature of culture: definitions, acquisition, characteristics, functions, adaptation, and change Language and communication: structure, use, change Subsistence strategies: environmental adaptation, food acquisition Kinship and marriage: kin groups and terminology, marriage customs, residence patterns,; gender relationships Social organization: social groups, stratification based on gender, race & ethnicity Economic systems: production, distribution and consumption Political organization & societal control: political groups, leadership, dominant-subordinate relationships Religion: functions, belief systems, organization, ritual Modernization and change: modes of change (colonialism, tourism, urbanization, technology, world markets) Applied anthropology: medical anthropology, public policy, advocacy

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts and field terminology used by anthropologists.

    Apply theories and methods used by anthropologists in the study of culture.

    Demonstrate knowledge of diversity in terms of ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation cross culturally.

    Demonstrate awareness of one’s own culture and the cultures of others; identify the difference between an ethnocentric point of view and a position of cultural relativism.

    Demonstrate knowledge of factors involved in culture change, including the influence of globalism.

  
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    ANTH& 207 - Linguistic Anthropology

    5 Credits
    Explores language in its social context, language structure and change, and intercultural explorations.

    Course Note Previously ANTHR 210.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students, social science majors, future teachers.
    Active Date 2015-10-30

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Social Science Area II
    Course Outline
    Language and its structure and analysis
    Language and the brain
    Sociolinguistics
    Intercultural contact and communication
    Non-human communication systems
    Language evolution
    Language development in children
    Dialectical diversity
    Language change and extinction

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze language structure.

    Identify characteristics of diverse language groups and cultures.

    Describe influence of power relationships on language policies and language groups.

    Identify the causes of intra- and intercultural miscommunication.

    Identify causes and extent of language extinction

  
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    ANTHR 291 - Independent Study

    1 Credits
    Complete an independent study project developed by the student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Any student who wishes to participate in a personal study of an anthropological subject that is not specifically offered through our curriculum.
    Active Date 2011-06-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 30 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 30
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Student/Instructor discussion determining appropriateness of the student pursuing an independent project 2. Student prepared outline of area(s) to be covered in student project 3. Acceptance of outline by instructor and time period established for project to be completed 4. Student completing agreed upon program 5. Evaluation of project by instructor

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Work independently to undertake and complete a project.

    Understand and utilize original research through use of library and other sources.

    Use and interpret anthropological data.

    Complete an acceptable project demonstrating the above objectives.

  
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    ANTHR 292 - Independent Study

    2 Credits
    Complete an independent study project developed by the student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Any student who wishes to participate in a personal study of an anthropological subject that is not specifically offered through our curriculum.
    Active Date 2011-06-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 60 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 60
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Student/Instructor discussion determining appropriateness of the student pursuing an independent project 2. Student prepared outline of area(s) to be covered in student project 3. Acceptance of outline by instructor and time period established for project to be completed 4. Student completing agreed upon program 5. Evaluation of project by instructor

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Work independently to undertake and complete a project.

    Understand and utilize original research through use of library and other sources.

    Use and interpret anthropological data.

    Complete an acceptable project demonstrating the above objectives.

  
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    ANTHR 295 - Independent Study

    5 Credits
    Complete an independent study project developed by the student and the instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Any student who wishes to participate in a personal study of an anthropological subject that is not specifically offered through our curriculum.
    Active Date 2013-01-10

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 60 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 60
    Degree Distributions: AA Social Science Area II
    Course Outline
    1. Student/Instructor discussion determining appropriateness of the student pursing an independent project 2. Student prepared outline of area(s) to be covered in student project 3. Acceptance of outline by instructor and time period established for project to be completed 4. Student completing agreed upon program 5. Evaluation of project by instructor

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Work independently to undertake and complete a project

    Understand and utilize original research through use of library, fieldwork, and other sources.

    Use and interpret anthropological data.

    Complete an acceptable project demonstrating the above objectives.


Arabic

  
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    ARAB 121 - Elementary Arabic

    5 Credits
    A comprehensive beginning Arabic course, which includes instruction and practice in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The class will be conducted almost exclusively in Arabic.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement; students interested in Arabic language and culture.
    Active Date 2015-02-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    - Arabic alphabet - Pronunciation/sound systems - Basic vocabulary: - Common daily greetings/ introductions (formal/ informal) - Arabic names/ family members - Responding to simple questions - Grammar: - Gender (masc/femn), noun, adjective phrases, plural forms (non-human plural) - Subject pronoun-Define article - Nominal sentences - Asking questions - Possessive pronouns, introduction to present tense, Introduction to Arabic cultures/ Arab World/ Arabic Dialects.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate ability to write, read and pronounce the Arabic alphabet.

    Demonstrate ability to engage in simple conversations involving greetings/introduction of self and others.

    Recognize basic geography of the ARAB World.

    Students demonstrate an understanding of Arabic-speaking cultures and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Students demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.

  
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    ARAB 122 - Elementary Arabic

    5 Credits
    A comprehensive beginning Arabic course, which includes instruction and practice in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The class will be conducted almost exclusively in Arabic.

    Pre-requisite(s) ARAB 121 with min 1.5
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement; students interested in languages interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2015-02-09

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    -Pronunciation

    - Vocabulary

    - Numbers

    - Grammar:

    *Adverbs-Idaafa (construct phrase) - Present tense (negation)

    *Demonstrative particles-Interrogative words

    *Al-Masdar

    *Use of prepositions with pronouns

    *Verb sentence

    *Noun-Adjective phrase - Fronted predicate

    *Past tense (negation)

    *Dual Form

    - Culture and diversity of the Arab World

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students demonstrate oral proficiency in Arabic with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking, and understanding.

    Students demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structures in daily and realistic contexts.

    Students demonstrate ability to read and write in Arabic.

    Students demonstrate an understanding of Arab-speaking cultures and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Students demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.

  
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    ARAB 123 - Elementary Arabic

    5 Credits
    A comprehensive beginning Arabic course, which includes instruction and practice in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The class will be conducted almost exclusively in Arabic.

    Pre-requisite(s) ARAB 121 with min 1.5
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement; students needing Humanities distribution credits; students interested in languages interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2011-08-08

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    – Pronunciation – Vocabulary – Time – Ordinals numbers – Arabic Dictionary – Grammar: *Root and pattern *Negation (use of Laysa) *Object pronouns *The superlative *Future tense (negation) *Quantifiers *Subject-verb agreement *Dual Form – The culture and diversity of Arabic cultures.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate ability to sustain conversations based on familiar topics covered in class.

    Demonstrate ability to understand and analyze more complex sentence structure; recognize and use verbs in major tenses.

    Students demonstrate ability to read and write in Arabic.

    Students demonstrate an understanding of Arab-speaking cultures and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Students demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.


Art

  
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    ART 101 - Design I: Two Dimensional

    5 Credits
    Through lectures and studio problem-solving experience, students will study the elements and principles of design and design effectiveness in the visual arts.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Designed to serve as a foundational course for students in Art, Visual Communication, Drafting Design and Interior Design as well as the general student population.
    Active Date 2011-07-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 44 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 77
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area II
    Course Outline
    SECTION 1: Foundations/Basic art & design terminology/Media SECTION 2: Elements of Design (Line, Shape, Texture, Space, Value, Color) SECTION 3: Principles of Design (Emphasis, Scale, Balance, Repetition, Rhythm, Variety, Economy) SECTION 4: Composition SECTION 5: Applications of Design (Fine Art, Graphic Design, Interior Design, Fashion, Printmaking)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate an understanding of the constituent elements and principles of two-dimensional design through applied projects.

    Demonstrate the ability to articulate critical observations on the use of the elements and principles of design in a given work.

    Demonstrate the ability to explore compositional layouts and develop concepts to solve design problems.

  
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    ART 102 - Design II: Three Dimensional

    5 Credits
    Application and study of the fundamental elements and principles of design as they specifically apply to 3-D form and space. Emphasis on the relationships and differences between 2- and 3-D design.

    Pre-requisite(s) ART 101
    Fees AF

    Designed to Serve All students
    Active Date 2011-06-13

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 44 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 77
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area II
    Course Outline
    General course instruction will be facilitated through hands-on projects supported by a lecture program. Early explorations will include the transformation of structural objects and human-made objects. The student will have experience in translating two-dimensional hand drawn design into a three-dimensional object. Options include fold, pierce, bend, stretch fibers; saw, drill, carve into a sheet of wood; bend, cut, drill, twist, forge a sheet of metal. Finally, students will gain experience in designing an environmental sculpture. Options include constructing a model for a large scale environmental sculpture and designing a concept for a water sculpture.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate ability to define three-dimensional design and distinguish it from two-dimensional design.

    Apply elements and principles of design to three-dimensional form and space.

    Demonstrate understanding of three-dimensional design in architecture, Industrial design, Interior design, landscape design and sculpture.

 

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