Dec 04, 2020  
2017-2018 Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Business

  
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    BUSN 225 - E-Commerce Management

    5 Credits
    Focuses on how businesses can use network technology to help them meet their goals. It is a management strategy class. Both consumer and business-to-business commerce will be covered and all topics will be addressed from a global perspective. Topics include marketing, operations, exporting and legal issues. Also include broad analysis of Websites for effectiveness both in reaching customers and in supporting the company’s strategy.

    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve GB, CIS, IMP, returning students
    Active Date 2011-02-17

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Introduction to E-Commerce E-Commerce definition: Overview Business model changes/trends Retail Business to Business Marketing: -Market segmentation (target audience) -Research -Brand -Added value -Advertising (on and off the web) -Learning relationships International: -Operations/Infrastructure -Culture -Exporting Operations: -Distribution/Fulfillment -Inventory management -Outsourcing Policy: -Privacy -Intellectual property -Free speech -Taxation -Other legal issues Strategy: -Competitive analysis -Integrating EC into corporate strategy -ROI/Other goals -Compliment bricks and mortar (channel conflict)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Create an e-commerce Business Plan.

    Define and identify how internet sites carry out the business activities of content, network service, and marketing.

    Describe current technologies available for e-commerce development.

    Perform a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis on an e-commerce business.

    Explain how the internet allows for information-intensive business models.

  
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    BUSN 226 - HR Mgmt: Technology & Data Analytics

    4 Credits


    Part of HR Certificate Program.  This course explores the use of technology to address human resources administrative processes for service delivery and to acquire, access and analyze data that are used to assess business and organizational issues

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in HR Certificate program. 

    Individuals who want to pursue a career in human resource management and entry and mid-level human resources workers who are seeking broader understanding of the options in their chosen occupation.

     
    Active Date 20170731T09:57:10

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44
    Total Contact Hours 44
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline

    1. Human capital management (HCM) software feature and their uses
    2. Integration of HCM and enterprise systems
    3. Applying technology to human resources processes
    4. Accessing and analyzing data to address organizational and human resource challenges and develop solutions


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate how HCM software can improve the efficiency of human resource processes

    Describe and discuss the factors and process for selecting HCM software

    Analyze data and metrics that can support decision making in organizational strategies and business planning

  
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    BUSN 233 - Financial Management

    5 Credits
    Introductory course in corporate financial management that will study beginning concepts associated with the allocation of scarce resources across assets over time. Analysis and calculations are done both by hand on paper and by using the spreadsheet program Excel. Topics covered are: financial statements and cash flow, time value of money, interest rates, discounted cash flow analysis, stocks, consumer, corporate and government debt, capital budgeting, exchange rates. Extensive practice with problem analysis, problem setup, making necessary calculations and making conclusions based on the calculations using Excel.

    Pre-requisite(s) BUSN 216 or BSTEC 165 and ACCTG 121
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve General Business and International Business students
    Active Date 2011-02-17

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Forms of business organization - Financial statement analysis and cash flows - Time value of money - Discounted cash flow analysis - Financial markets and interest rates - Valuing Stocks & Debt - Capital budgeting decision methods - Valuing Debt - International finance

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze a business problem, gather the necessary data to solve the business problem, set the problem up, make the necessary calculations to solve the problem, make conclusions based on the calculations, and state conclusion in words.

    Use Excel to perform financial calculations with an emphasis on data type, Number Formatting, financial functions and formulas, and spreadsheet setup for complex calculations. Basic, intermediate and advanced financial formulas will be learned.

    Perform financial statement analysis to gage performance of firms using Excel.

    Determine cash flows from accrual accounting financial statements using Excel.

    Use numerous financial formulas to make time values of money calculations, including loan valuation, stock valuation, interest rate determination, discounted cash flow analysis, capital budgeting, and foreign exchange determination to help with making financial decisions of allocating capital.

    Develop complex dynamic spreadsheets for capital budgeting and consumer loan analysis.

  
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    BUSN 234 - Sales Management

    5 Credits


    A focused look at the sales process from an account management perspective.  Covers topics such as business development and key account management, B2B sales, negotiations and deal making, and skills and attributes needed for maintaining customer relationships.

    Pre-requisite(s) BUSN 134
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve General Business students, Professional Sales students and other programs in the Business department
    Active Date 20170731T09:57:12

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    B2B Sales vs B2C

    Lead and Business Development

    Decision Making

    Negotiating

    Customer Relations and Relationship Building

    Key Account Management

     

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Research and discuss a wide range of interesting and dynamic sales professions within the for-profit and nonprofit sectors of the economy

    Formulate a list of priorities that a salesperson must accomplish to create customer loyalty

    Formulate marketing and sales strategies that incorporate psychological and sociological factors which influence customers

    Use effective negotiation skills in role playing scenarios

    Develop a plan to manage a key customer account

  
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    BUSN 238 - E-Marketing

    5 Credits
    Students will explore how Internet technology is reshaping fundamental business marketing strategies. Focuses on how the Internet enables marketing organizations to become interactive and customer oriented. Topics include e-marketing for consumer and business-to-business, Internet promotion, network and facilitation services and providing electronic marketing content. Includes broad analysis of Websites for marketing effectiveness.

    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Community at large, as well as students in the following departments: General Business, CIS, IMP, Travel/Transportation, Hotel/Tourism, and Office Occupations
    Active Date 2011-03-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    I. Introduction to E-marketing II. E-Marketing technology and business strategy A. The Internet: A new business model creates marketing change B. Market-facing enterprises and customer driven strategy C. The World Wide Web: history and how it works III. Promotion and communication on line A. Hypermedia communication goals B. The AIOA Model C. Advertising and building customer relations on line IV. Computer mediated marketing A. Creating value: How interactivity creates business advantage B. On line purchasing: Shopping, selling and information collection strategy C. Site analysis: Visuals, content, interactivity, and on line research design D. Business-to-business marketing strategy E. The mechanics: Privacy, pricing and distribution V. The future of web-based marketing A. Web content B. Network facilitation C. Nature of marketing innovation: where do we go from here?

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Explain the role of internet technologies in business marketing strategies.

    Explain how the internet produces customer-focused, market facing marketing organizations.

    Define and identify how internet sites carry out the marketing activities of content, network service, promotion and sales.

    Explain the major web analytics tools.

    Create an internet marketing plan.

  
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    BUSN 240 - Cooperative Education

    5 Credits
    Cooperative education provides an opportunity for students to combine classroom theory with practical work experience. Experience gained in the workplace is related to the student’s field of study or career goals.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note Requires work experience coordinated with instructor.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who want to gain practical work experience, test career choices and compare classroom theory with workplace practices
    Active Date 2011-04-20

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 150 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 150
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. measurable learning objectives. 2. Setting and accomplishing goals. 3. Career development or exploration through work experience. 4. Successful work habits and attitudes. 5. Interpersonal communication skills.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Perform assigned duties in a friendly and courteous manner and accept feedback

    Communicate effectively with a variety of people and contribute in a team environment

    Arrive to the workplace on time for scheduled work hours prepared for work and professional in appearance and attitude

    Demonstrate successful work habits and attitudes such as: Showing initiative and ways for improvement in the completion of assigned tasks; Perform duties independently while working towards meeting goals and deadlines; Demonstrate time management in the completion of job duties

    Select and apply appropriate technology to the task assigned and analyze problems and choose appropriate solutions, seeking clarification when necessary

    Create a learning plan in collaboration with employer and advisor which details skills that will be learned in the workplace.

  
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    BUSN 252 - Project Management Fundamentals

    5 Credits
    Designed to teach current project management software and concepts, in accordance with PMI methodology. Highly interactive course requiring extensive team work and case study analysis.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Business Technology and Business students looking for a solid foundation in project management fundamentals, using PMI methodology. Designed for entry level project administrators. This is not a PMP preparation class.
    Active Date 2015-04-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Identifying and selecting projects

    Developing project proposals

    Defining Scope, Quality, Responsibility, and Activity Sequence

    Developing the schedule

    Resource utilization

    Determining costs, budget, and earned value

    Managing risk

    Closing the project

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students will recognize, and appropriately use the terminology of Project Management and describe the elements of a project.

    Students will identify, define, and practice the roles in Project Management work

    Students will demonstrate how to identify and select projects.

    Students will demonstrate project planning techniques including scope definition and management, project quality, work breakdown structure, activity sequencing, project scheduling, and project budgeting, through case study analysis and assessment.

    Students will demonstrate project performing and controlling techniques including resource utilization, budget management and earned value calculations, and risk management, through case study analysis and assessment.

  
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    BUSN 262 - Microsoft Project

    3 Credits
    Teaches Microsoft Project project-management software.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Business, or other students who will use MS Project to manage projects.
    Active Date 2015-05-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Project Basics

    Establishing Resources

    Resource and Task Assignments

    Refining your Project Schedule

    Fine-Tuning Tasks

    Fine-Tuning Resources

    Project Information: Sorting, Grouping, and Filtering

    Project Schedule Formatting Fundamentals

    Project Schedule Tracking Fundamentals

    Project Reporting

    Integrating Project with other programs

    Project Schedule Optimization

    Advanced Project Schedule Formatting

    Managing Multiple Projects

    Working with Resource Pools

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate the ability to set up a new project, establish resources, manage resource and task assignments, manage the project schedule, and generate project reports using the Microsoft Project software.

    Demonstrate the ability to integrate Microsoft Project with other Microsoft Office applications.

  
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    BUSN 265 - HR Management Strategy & Workforce Development

    5 Credits
    Review of human resource management as a profession, HR Management and strategy, overviews of equal employment opportunity laws, policy and procedure relating to employment recruitment, selection and retention issues, workforce diversity, and job analysis and job description development.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve First in three part series for Students interested in AAS HR certificate, degree, AA emphasis degree and those wanting to prepare for the PHR certification.
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. HR Management and Strategy 2. Employee Recruitment 3. Employee Selection 4. Employee Relations and Retention 5. The Legal Framework for Equal Employment Opportunity 6. Managing EEO and Diversity 7. Job Analysis and Job Descriptions

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Identify and describe key aspects of Human Resource management, process analysis, and strategic planning.

    Explain employee recruitment approaches, sources and evaluative processes.

    Describe and discuss selection processes and procedures including legal aspects and key considerations for interviewing.

    Demonstrate understanding of employee relations and retention including the psychological contract, motivation, and managing retention.

    Identify and explain the legal framework of equal employment including basic concepts, specific legislation, compliance and enforcement approaches and requirements and legal issues as part of the selection process.

    Review and evaluate management situations and approaches that address equal employment and diversity including concerns related to harassment, aging employees, reasonable accommodation, religious beliefs, affirmative action and the need for diversity training.

    Demonstrate skills in behavioral and legal aspects of job analysis including work flow and re-engineering and developing job descriptions using job design characteristics.

  
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    BUSN 266 - Labor and Employee Relations

    5 Credits
    Overview of Union and employee relations topics from organization, labor and employee perspectives, Reviews policy and procedures relating to HR Ethics, HR Information Systems, and total rewards covering compensation systems and benefits administration

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Second in three part series for Students interested in AAS HR certificate, degree, AA emphasis degree and those wanting to prepare for the PHR certification
    Active Date 2012-09-28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Labor and Management Relations 2. Employee Rights and Responsibilities 3. HR and Ethics 4. Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS) 5. Total Rewards a. Compensation systems b. Benefits administration

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Describe the stages in the unionization process, the employee-union relationship over time, processes inherent via union representation, types of unionization and legal rulings impacting relationships

    Explain the elements of employee rights and responsibilities including relations, disciplinary action, grievances, termination, demotion, downsizing, transfers, promotions, resignations, retirements, etc.

    Define and discuss the importance of ethical behavior in the HR profession, the elements of an ethics program, legal responsibility, and typical ethical issues in HR.

    Demonstrate the purposes of human resource information systems for security and comprehensive data and research application.

    Identify and explain all aspects of compensating human resources, including concepts, historical perspective, legal requirements, and the differentiation of types of compensation.

    Demonstrate understanding and application of benefits administration including strategic benefits consideration, mandatory and voluntary benefits, managing health benefits, and types of retirement plans.

  
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    BUSN 267 - Risk Management and Professional Development

    5 Credits
    Covers various human resource issues at a management, policy and procedural level as it relates to occupational health, safety and security, employee training and development, talent management, and performance management. Topics also include legal problem solving and the emerging role of human resources as an organization’s strategic partner.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students interested in AAS HR certificate, degree, AA emphasis degree and those wanting to prepare for the PHR certification.
    Active Date 2012-12-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 34
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Occupational Health, Safety and Security 2. Employee Training 3. Instructional Design 4. Talent Management and Development 5. Performance Management Systems 6. Legal Problem Solving for Human Resources 7. The Emerging Roles of Human Resources

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Identify and discuss comprehensive aspects of risk management including topics such as occupational health, safety, laws and implications, workplace violence, and disaster preparation.

    Discuss the value of a strategic approach to professional development, the role of training for the organization, the training process, and types of training delivery.

    Demonstrate knowledge of adult learning principles, ability to engage adults in a interactive presentation, and ability to create on-the -job training.

    Discuss topics related to talent management and development including employee development needs, succession planning, and diversity in talent management.

    Demonstrate understanding the use and application of performance management systems and the ability to conduct a performance evaluation and develop and action plan.

    Describe potential legal problems and solutions in HR and demonstrate knowledge of legal insurance, legal forces, and case law.

    Explain the value of human resources management for all managers and the strategic trends in the HR field.

  
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    BUSN 268 - Leadership

    3 Credits
    Leadership is not management, it is the ability to inspire and influence others towards a goal or vision. This course works to develop practical leadership skills to influence the organizational performance for managers and non-managers. Topics include leadership roles and styles; the communication process; team building and group interactions

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve AAS Business students; contract students through various Continuing Ed partners.
    Active Date 2015-03-25

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Effective Leadership Behavior
    Leading Change & Innovation
    Participative Leadership & Empowerment
    Leadership Traits and Skills
    Power & Influence Tactics
    Leadership in Groups & Teams
    Transformational Leadership
    Cross Cultural Leadership


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Describe the skills and abilities needed for creating and managing change

    Describe the ways a leader can motivate employees or others in an organization

    Assess and analyze personal leadership strengths and weaknesses

    Demonstrate problem-solving and decision-making skills in simulated situations

    Recognize and communicate the importance of diverse perspectives in various social and organizational scenarios. Demonstrate techniques to strengthen the dialogue amongst these perspectives and the approaches to calloborative problem solving

  
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    BUSN 269 - Leadership 2: Supervision

    2 Credits
    Examines concepts and practical application of fundamental supervisory skills such as planning, staffing, communicating, leading, using technology, training, managing conflict, and problem solving.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Airport University students; AAS students in Business
    Active Date 2015-05-13

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Choosing between effective and ineffective leadership styles.

    Relationship between styles and the motivation and behavior of others

    The four steps to active supervision

    Proven process for problem solving

    Five steps for effective decision-making

    The need for delegation and how to delegate effectively

    Ways to communicate more effectively and vividly

    Difference between coaching and discipline

    Convert conflicts into problem solving sessions

    Effective tools for dealing with difficult people



    Student Learning Outcomes
    Discuss your supervisory style and how it affects others

    Explain how to develop a productive work environment

    Demonstrate essential communication skills used to motivate those being supervised

    Discuss the practical application of supervisory skills need for effective leadership

  
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    BUSN 270 - Principles of Management and Superv

    5 Credits
    Examines the managerial task, with emphasis on the supervisory level. Includes coverage of the major management functions of planning,, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling. Covers decision making, human behavior and motivation, and the outside forces affecting today’s manager. Uses interactive class activities and case analysis.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve General Business program students as well as other professional-technical program students
    Active Date 2014-06-04

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. The nature of management and supervision 2. Planning an controlling 3. Making effective decisions 4. Motivation and human behavior 5. Managing conflict and change 6. Communication, oral and written 7. Leadership styles 8. Performance appraisal 9. Discipline and awards 10. Supervising protected groups 11. Managing a unionized work group 12. Corporate and managerial ethics

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate an understanding of management vocabulary, concepts and principles as measured by critical thinking and effective communication.

    Execute role play activities modeling important management/supervision functions.

    Discuss management skills involving mastering problem solving and decision making techniques.

    Define and discuss future trends in management including diversity management and management for sustaiinability.

    Recognize the iinteraction of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling in both domestic and international management environments.

  
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    BUSN 281 - Special Topics

    1 Credits
    Topics such as doing business in a region or country and understanding NAFTA. Professional development seminar to be offered on an as-need basis.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students pursing and AAS degree in International Business or General Business
    Active Date 2011-03-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 11
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    To be determined by topic chosen

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Research and anaylyze chosen topic in order to discuss information in professional and knowledgeable manner

    Identify and explain linkages between chosen topic and career objectives

    Locate resources that will provide in depth knowledge about chosen topic

  
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    BUSN 282 - Special Topics

    2 Credits
    Topics such as doing business in a region or country and understanding NAFTA. Professional development seminar to be offered on an as-need basis.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students pursing an AAS degree in International Business or General Business
    Active Date 2011-06-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    To be determined by topic chosen

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Research and analyze chosen topic in order to discuss information orally and in writing in professional and knowledgeable manner

    Identify and explain linkages between chosen topic and career objectives

    Locate resources that will provide in depth knowledge about chosen topic

  
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    BUSN 283 - Special Topics

    3 Credits
    Topics such as doing business in a region or country and understanding NAFTA. Professional development seminar to be offered on an as-need basis.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students pursing an AAS degree in International Business or General Business
    Active Date 2011-06-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    To be determined by topic chosen

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Research and analyze chosen topic in order to discuss information both orally and in writing in a professional and knowledgeable manner

    Identify and explain linkages between chosen topic and career objectives

    Locate resources that will provide in depth knowledge about chosen topic

  
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    BUSN 285 - Special Topics

    5 Credits
    Topics such as doing business in a region or country and understanding NAFTA. Professional development seminar to be offered on an as-need basis.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students pursing an AAS degree in International Business or General Business
    Active Date 2012-02-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    To be determined by topic chosen

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Research and anaylyze chosen topic in order to discuss information in professional and knowledgeable manner

    Identify and explain linkages between chosen topic and career objectives

    Locate resources that will provide in depth knowledge about chosen topic

  
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    BUSN 305 - International Regulatory Environment

    5 Credits
    An overview of the international business regulatory environment with a focus on import and export compliance procedures, documentation and resources. Topics include: WTO, Trade Agreements, tariff rules and applications, anti-dumping regulation, subsidies and countervailing duties, trade in services, trade-related intellectual property, US Customs regulations and US Export regulations.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the BAS Global Trade & Logistics program
    Active Date 2015-10-30

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    International Trade Environment
    GATT/WTO
    Trade Agreements
    Intellectual Property
    Export Compliance
    Import Compliance
    Implications of violations
    Record Keeping requirement



    Student Learning Outcomes
    Use industry terminology to discuss and explain issues related to the international trade regulatory environment

    Locate and navigate resources related to the international regulatory environment (including HTSUS, BIS, DOC, WTO) for the purpose of finding answers to specific compliance questions.

    Explain the reasoning behind and scope of the BIS and its controls and demonstrate working knowledge of the EAR and CCL

    Demonstrate knowledge of documentation related to import/export compliance

    Analyze and discuss the compliance duties and responsibilities as an importer and as a Customs broker

  
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    BUSN 310 - Supply Chain Management

    5 Credits
    Adoption of a supply chain orientation toward business management which emphasizes the inter-functional and inter-firm relationships that contribute to improving coordination of operations and performance of organizations that participate in various types of supply chains

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students pursuing a BAS degree in Global Trade & Logistics
    Active Date 2014-11-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 10
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Operation & Supply Chain strategy
    Managing Processes
    Process Mapping & Analysis
    Manufacturing & Service Process Structure
    Product/Process Innovation
    Managing Quality
    Quality Improvement Tools
    Lean Management
    Customer Management
    Supply Management
    Demand Planning
    Sales & Operations Planning
    Logistics Management
    Independent Demand Inventory Planning
    Materials Requirement Planning


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate a competence of supply chain concepts, requisite to participate in an operations environment

    Discuss how to collaborate and coordinate with other functions within the firm and across firms in the supply chain

    Demonstrate and use analytical tools to address case scenarios involving supply chain management decisions

    Identify current issues and problems which affect the supply chains of firms and suggest ways in which such issues and problems may be addressed

  
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    BUSN 318 - Project Management

    5 Credits
    Introduces the principles and techniques used in the Project Management process. Students will develop the tools needed for each phase of the project management process: initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling and closing.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the BAS in Global Trade and Cybersecurity
    Active Date 2015-12-04

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline


    Project organization

    Project budgeting and inspection

    Start-up procedures

    Project documentation (reports, logs, etc.)

    Progress measurement

    Concepts of partnering and total quality management

    Change orders, claims and submittal processing

    Cost control

    Project closeout



    Student Learning Outcomes
    Explain the stages of project development and how they are implemented

    Identify Critical Success Factors and how they play a role in the completion of a project.

    Use project management software to plan and monitor complex projects

    Discuss the role of project management in different career areas. .

  
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    BUSN 338 - Global Marketing Management

    5 Credits
    Examines the impact of economic, cultural, political, legal and other environmental influences on international marketing decisions. Includes how to identify and analyze worldwide marketing opportunities and examine product, pricing, distribution and promotion strategies from a global perspective. Provides students with the opportunity to develop an international marketing plan.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the BAS Global Trade & Logistics program
    Active Date 2015-10-01

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Introduction/Overview

    Cultural/Political/Legal systems

    Global Risk Assessment

    Global Marketing Research

    Market segmentation and types of positioning approaches

    Industry Globalization drivers: Regionalization and Emerging Markets

    Identifying Market Entry preferences

    Global Products and Global Brands

    Financial Issues: Pricing in Global Markets

    Communication & Advertising in Global Markets

    Personal Selling, Retailing and Ecommerce in Global Markets

    Creating a Global Marketing Plan



    Student Learning Outcomes
    Identify and use public business information and international data sources to conduct advanced global market research.

    Identify and explain the differences between marketing at home and marketing in an international environment

    Create marketing plans in foreign markets that adjust the marketing mix appropriate for the host culture

    Explain key concepts of global marketing

    Analyze consumer behavior in global markets in terms of: Cross-cultural values, Group influences, Individual or psychological influences and Consumer decision-making processes

  
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    BUSN 420 - Lean Six Sigma Processes

    5 Credits
    Quality and continuous improvement is one of the foundations on which businesses survive and grow. It is no longer a luxury but a necessity for all businesses and economies to continuously improve the quality of goods and services produced by them. Quality improvement over time tends to increase customer satisfaction, lower the total cost of the goods and services, and enhance the reputation of the firm. Towards this end, the course aims to introduce the essential concepts, tools, and methodologies of Lean and Six Sigma.

    Pre-requisite(s) BUSN 310
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students enrolled in the BAS Global Trade & Logistics
    Active Date 2015-05-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 10
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Overview of Quality Management

    Intro to Six Sigma

    Intro to Lean Management

    DMAIC Methodology



    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate a competence of Lean Management and Six Sigma concepts

    Use statistical software to interpret and analyze data

    Identify the various steps in the DMAIC methodology.

    Identify the problem and come up with a road map to solve the problem using Lean and Six Sigma tools.

  
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    BUSN 425 - Purchasing & Supply Chain Management

    5 Credits
    Purchasing processes, procurement cycle analysis, research to support purchasing decisions, supplier relationship development and management, negotiations, commodity planning, costing, pricing, and value analysis related to the purchasing of products and services

    Pre-requisite(s) BUSN 310
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the BAS for Global Trade & Logistics
    Active Date 2014-11-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 10
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Purchasing Process Supply Chain Integration Purchasing & Supply Chain Organization Supply Management/Commodity Strategic Development Supplier Evaluation & Selection Supplier Quality Management Supplier Management & Development World Wide Sourcing Strategic Cost Management Purchasing & Supply Chain Analysis Negotiations Contract Management

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Explain purchasing and supply management from a total systems perspective

    Outline the key issues and developments in managing supplier, customer management and supply chain partner relationships

    Adopt and apply conceptual framework(s) to better understand the process of developing, negotiating, contracting, managing conflict, and measuring performance in supply chain business relationships to enable greater competitiveness

    Define and explain the important terminology, facts, concepts, principles, and theories used in the field of purchasing and supply management

    Apply the appropriate concepts, tools and techniques to resolve problems in purchasing and supply management.

  
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    BUSN 440 - Cooperative Education

    5 Credits
    Cooperative education provides an opportunity for students to combine classroom theory with practical work experience. Experience gained in the workplace is related to the student’s field of study or career goals.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Course Note Requires work experience coordinated with instructor.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who want to gain practical work experience, test career choices and compare classroom theory with workplace practices
    Active Date 2016-04-05

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 150 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 150
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. measurable learning objectives. 2. Setting and accomplishing goals. 3. Career development or exploration through work experience. 4. Successful work habits and attitudes. 5. Interpersonal communication skills.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Perform assigned duties in a friendly and courteous manner and accept feedback

    Communicate effectively with a variety of people and contribute in a team environment

    Arrive to the workplace on time for scheduled work hours prepared for work and professional in appearance and attitude

    Demonstrate successful work habits and attitudes such as: Showing initiative and ways for improvement in the completion of assigned tasks; Perform duties independently while working towards meeting goals and deadlines; Demonstrate time management in the completion of job duties

    Select and apply appropriate technology to the task assigned and analyze problems and choose appropriate solutions, seeking clarification when necessary

    Create a learning plan in collaboration with employer and advisor which details skills that will be learned in the workplace.

  
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    BUSN 455 - Financial Management

    5 Credits
    Course in corporate financial management that will study the concepts associated with the allocation of scarce resources across assets over time. Analysis and calculations are done both by hand on paper and by using the spreadsheet program Excel. Topics covered are: financial statements and cash flow, time value of money, interest rates, discounted cash flow analysis, stocks, consumer, corporate and government debt, capital budgeting, exchange rates. Also includes basic concepts of International Financial Management. Extensive practice with problem analysis, problem setup, making necessary calculations and making conclusions based on the calculations using Excel.

    Pre-requisite(s) BUSN 218 and ACCT& 202 and BUSN 210
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the BAS Global Trade & Logistics program
    Active Date 2015-05-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Forms of business organization

    - Financial statement analysis and cash flows

    - Time value of money

    - Discounted cash flow analysis

    - Financial markets and interest rates

    - Valuing Stocks & Debt

    - Capital budgeting decision methods

    - Valuing Debt

    - International finance

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Analyze a business problem, gather the necessary data to solve the business problem, set the problem up, make the necessary calculations to solve the problem, make conclusions based on the calculations, and state conclusion in words.

    Use Excel to perform financial calculations with an emphasis on data type, Number Formatting, financial functions and formulas, and spreadsheet setup for complex calculations. Basic, intermediate and advanced financial formulas will be learned.

    Perform financial statement analysis to gage performance of firms using Excel.

    Determine cash flows from accrual accounting financial statements using Excel.

    Use numerous financial formulas to make time values of money calculations, including loan valuation, stock valuation, interest rate determination, discounted cash flow analysis, capital budgeting, and foreign exchange determination to help with making financial decisions of allocating capital.

    Develop complex dynamic spreadsheets for capital budgeting and consumer loan analysis.

  
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    BUSN 475 - Global Supply Chain Management

    5 Credits
    This course is about global logistics and the role of logistics and other activities in global supply chain management. Global systems are represented by a complex web of carriers, forwarders, bankers, information and communications companies, traders and so on that facilitate international transactions, trades related to the movement of goods and services. This course covers practical aspects of global logistics and investigates the transactional, cultural, governmental and other factors that influence global commerce.

    Pre-requisite(s) BUSN 310
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students enrolled in the BAS for Global Trade & Logistics
    Active Date 2015-01-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 10
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Global Supply Chain overview
    2. Global Trends
    3. Financial Considerations
    4. Risk Management
    5. Logistics and Transportation
    6. Outsourcing
    7. Regions: Europe
    8. Regions: Asia
    9. Regions: Africa & Middle East
    10. Regions: South America
    11. Security/Sustainability
    12. Ethics/Rights

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Understand and explain the various transactions that accompany the movement of goods and services throughout the globe

    Apply fundamental knowledge of the political, legal, economic, cultural and environmental aspects of global supply chain management to case studies and decision making

    Apply fundamental elements of global logistics planning and management activities related to international outsourcing, materials management, distribution and transportation.

    Explain how the international transportation options can influence supply chain planning and management activities

    Discuss the basic requirements to employ intermediaries in global transactions

    Discuss how a global perspective of supply chain management can affect a firm’s competitive advantage

  
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    BUSN 495 - Independent Study

    5 Credits


    An individual study project developed by the student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the BAS for Global Trade & Logistics
    Active Date 20170509T10:06:18

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Other 275
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1.  Student and Instructor determine scope of independent study

    2.  Student and instructor determine activities and/or project to be completed andn timeline for completion

    3.  Student completes activities and/or projects

    4.  Evaluation of work by instructor

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Plan a project, paper or other deliverable applicable to the field of study

    Present findings and ideas in fluent, coherent and logical way


Business Intelligence

  
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    BI 348 - Business Analytics: Data Analysis and Deci

    5 Credits
    Using Microsoft Excel and statistical analytic methods, learn how to convert real world large data sets into useful information for decision making. A hands on approach to learning business analytics using the latest version of Microsoft Excel to make meaning of the torrent of data that business people now handle. Descriptive and analytic statistical methods will be used, but with every case problem we will use large data sets and convert the unorganized raw data into useful information for decision making

    Pre-requisite(s) BUSN 210 and BUSN 218
    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS - BUSN
    Course Note Acceptance to BAS in Global Trade & Logistics required.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students pursuing the BAS in Global Trade & Logistics
    Active Date 2015-11-18

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Intro to data analysis and decision making

    2. Describing the distribution of a single variable

    3. Finding relationships between variables

    4. Probability and probability distributions

    5. Normal, Binomial, Poisson and Exponential distributions

    6. Decision making under uncertainty

    7. Sampling and sampling distribution

    8. Confidence intervals

    9. Hypothesis testing

    10. Regression analysis: estimating relationships

    11. Regression analysis: statistical inference

    12. Time series analysis and forecasting

    13. Introduction to optimization modeling

    14. Optimization models

    15. Introduction to simulation modeling

    16. Simulation models

    17. Statistical process control

    18. Optional: Data mining, ANOV



    Student Learning Outcomes
    Use descriptive and analytic statistical methods to convert unorganized raw data into useful information for decision making

    Explain the different types of data that Excel can understand.

    Create and setup efficient spreadsheets for calculations and data analysis

    Create basic, intermediate and advanced charts to visualize quantitative data so it can be used by decision makers

    Create basic, intermediate and advanced PivotTables and effectively use Power Query for importing large data sets from multiple sources


Business Technology

  
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    BSTEC 100 - Fundamentals of Office Management

    5 Credits
    This class will provide the fundamental skills to work in any office administrative position supporting small and large businesses. The student will learn an overview of the types of organizations, administrative positions, and skills needed, effective telecommunication skills, how to organize and manage appointments, visitors, offices, time, meetings, events, travel arrangements. mail and office equipment, how to manage records and processing basic banking and accounting procedures in Administrative roles.

    Pre-requisite(s) ENGL 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve For students who want to develop the basic office skills to work in any administrative professional position.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Understanding the Changing and Challenging Office for Administrative Professionals in supporting small and large businesses

    Developing Professional Skills

    Office Organization & Time Management

    Telecommunications including telephone communication, technical, techniques, and etiquette skills

    Handling Mail & Office Equipment

    Records Management

    Basic Banking and Accounting Procedures in Administrative Roles

    Scheduling and Managing Appointments and Receiving Visitors

    Making Travel Arrangements

    Planning Events, Meetings, and Conferences

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Think critically about emerging technologies; perform research on the use of emerging technologies, synthesize information and present a report on the findings.

    Students will identify and define types of organizations, structures, missions, ethics, trends, roles, titles, functions, and responsibilities of an Administrative Professional

    Students will demonstrate proficiency handling mail and office equipment, scheduling and managing appointments, receiving visitors, making travel arrangements, and planning events, meetings, and conferences

    Students will identify, utilize, and establish an ergonomic office environment

    Students will demonstrate accurate and effective records management, banking and accounting principles for an Administrative Professional, time management and office organization.

    Student will demonstrate proficient telecommunication skills including verbal communication, technical, techniques, and etiquette.

  
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    BSTEC 105 - Intro to Computers & Windows

    3 Credits
    Designed for the student who has limited or no computer skills. Students learn about personal computer hardware, system software including the Windows operating system, and file management systems. Modular format with one-on-one and group instruction. However, may be taken at variable credits and student may work faster or slower in a self-paced environment.

    Pre-requisite(s) ENGL 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Any student needing basic knowledge of computers, operating systems, and file management..
    Active Date 2015-01-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Learning the Windows Desktop
    File Storage, including removable media such as USB Drives
    File management using file and Windows Explorer
    Organizing and protecting information
    Using Windows programs and utilities
    Customizing Windows

    Computer hardware

    Computer software

    Essential computer skills; operating system and accessories

    Problem solving

    Customizing desktop

    Windows Explorer

    File management

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in terminology though the use of correct computer terminology in business settings.

    Demonstrate the ability to navigate and utilize the Windows operating system and associated utilities.

    Demonstrate the creation of, saving of, and management of files and folders in the Windows operating system.

    Demonstrate the ability to customize the computer using the Windows operating system.

    Demonstrate the ability to create appropriate file management systems with proper naming conventions.

  
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    BSTEC 108 - Online Learning with Canvas

    2 Credits
    Modular format with one-on-one and group instruction. However, may be taken at variable credits and student may work faster or slower in a self-paced environment. Teaches students the basic functions of Canvas as it relates to online learning.

    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Recommeded: BSTEC 105 or basic computer knowledge
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students planning to work in an online course environment
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-2
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Is on-line learning for you?

    2. Personal Information

    3. Email, attachments and links

    4. Discussion Board Posting and Reply

    5. Using the Canvas Course Management System

    6. Email Etiquette

    7. Netiquette

    8. Group discussion

    9. Downloading files

    10. Digital Drop box

    Student Learning Outcomes
  
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    BSTEC 110 - Keyboarding & Document Processing

    5 Credits
    Mastery of the keyboard and speed and accuracy development. Students will use their word processing skills to format business documents.

    Pre-requisite(s) ENGL 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students who desire to develop proper keyboarding and word processing skills necessary for employment in an office environment.
    Active Date 2015-01-27

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Introduction to keyboarding.

    - Fundamentals of ergonomics and proper keyboarding technique.

    - Develop keyboarding speed and accuracy.

    - Perform various 1-, 3- and 5-minute timed writings to increase speed and accuracy.

    - Create business documents including personal and business letters, tables, e-mails, memos, reports, and employment documents.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in using correct fingering on letters and numbers while keyboarding by touch.

    Demonstrate proper ergonomics and keyboarding technique while keyboarding by touch.

    Develop and demonstrate keyboarding speed and accuracy.

    Create business documents while using basic word processing skills.

  
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    BSTEC 115 - Keyboarding Speed and Accuracy

    3 Credits
    Touch keyboarding on the letter and numeric keyboard. Students will be able to properly utilize the keyboard more accurately and at a rate of speed over their baseline accuracy and speed.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 110 and ENGL 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Instructor permission may be granted if student types a minimum of 30 words per minute (wpm) by touch using proper technique.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students who desire to increase their keyboarding speed and/or accuracy rates.
    Active Date 2015-01-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Review alphabetic and numeric keys by touch on the computer.
    - Develop keyboarding speed and accuracy through appropriate drills.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in identifying and using correct fingering on letters and numbers while keyboarding by touch.

    Increase keyboarding accuracy over baseline accuracy.

    Increase speed over baseline speed.

    Demonstrate proper ergonomics and keyboarding technique while keyboarding by touch.

  
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    BSTEC 118 - 10-Key Mastery

    2 Credits
    Continuous enrollment with one-on-one and group instruction. Student may work faster or slower in a self-paced environment. Touch keyboarding on the numeric key pad. Students will be able to properly utilize the 10-key pad by touch while increasing speed and accuracy.

    Course Note Basic computer knowledge and keyboarding skills recommended.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Any student who desires to increase their 10-key speed and/or accuracy rates.
    Active Date 2015-01-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Review numeric keys by touch on the computer
    - Develop 10-key speed and accuracy through appropriate drills

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in using correct fingering on the 10-key pad while keyboarding by touch.

    Demonstrate proper ergonomics and 10-key technique while keyboarding by touch.

  
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    BSTEC 120 - Introduction to MS Office Software

    5 Credits
    Variable credit with one-on-one and group instruction. Students may work faster or slower in a self-paced environment. Learn basic software features and their application in an office environment using the Microsoft Office Professional suite: Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, and Outlook.

    Pre-requisite(s) ENGL 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Working knowledge of Windows Operating system and file management systems.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students needing an understanding of the basic features of each of the MS Office programs.
    Active Date 2015-01-29

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Managing Information using Outlook, OneNote, and Windows Explorer
    Creating Word Documents
    Creating Excel Spreadsheets
    Creating and Managing Databases
    Creating PowerPoint Presentations

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in saving, printing, editing,formatting and enhancing Word documents, Excel worksheets ,PowerPoint presentations, and Access databases.

    Demonstrate proficiency in managing documents and folders while working with multiple documents.

    Be able to apply the appropriate Microsoft Office software to business needs.

  
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    BSTEC 139 - Pre-internship Seminar

    2 Credits
    To be taken at least one quarter before student plans to do an internship; prepare for internship by drafting resumes, cover letters and thank you letters; participate in mock interviews and learning how to research and and identify internship opportunities in the public and private sectors.

    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students in Business Technology and other students interested internships in these or related fields.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Finding an internship

    2. Resumes

    3. Cover letters

    4. Interviews

    5. Networking

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Write cover letters, resumes, and thank you letters that incorporate personal, professional, and academic skills and accomplishments.

    Practice interviewing skills and participate in a graded mock interview.

    Identify a personal network and job network to be used doing the internship search process.

  
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    BSTEC 140 - Internship

    5 Credits
    The Internship provides an opportunity for students to combine classroom theory with practical work experience. Experience gained in the workplace is related to the student’s field of study or career goals.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 139 and concurrent enrollment in BSTEC 141.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students in Business Technology programs or related fields.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 150 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 150
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Practical experience working in a business office doing administrative assistant, bookkeeping or office management duties under supervision.

    2. Networking for professional growth.

    3. Career development or exploration through work experience.

    4. Successful work habits and attitude.

    5. Interpersonal communication skills.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Perform assigned duties to meet or exceed internship objectives that are documented and agreed upon by the internship supervisor, faculty supervisor, and student intern.

    Practice using business technology skills in the workplace.

  
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    BSTEC 141 - Internship Seminar

    1 Credits
    Weekly classroom seminars designed to enhance the practical experiences of the business information technology internship. Feedback and discussion on pertinent work issues, including ethics, office politics, delegation, asking for help, networking and identifying future career goals.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 139 and concurrent enrollment in BSTEC 140.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students in Business Technology classes and programs.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 26
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 11
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Ethics in a professional office setting practice

    2. Office politics

    3. Office dynamics

    4. Enhancing and developing business information technology skills through practical experience

    5. Networking

    6. Future career goals

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Apply classroom theory and personal experience to common workplace scenarios through graded discussion.

  
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    BSTEC 150 - Microsoft Word

    5 Credits
    Students may work faster or slower in a self-paced variable credit environment. Designed for students who will use word processing software. Students will learn beginning to advanced features of the Microsoft Word program including to creating, editing, formatting, printing, saving and retrieving, enhancing and organizing documents. This course mirrors instruction required for MOS certification.

    Pre-requisite(s) ENGL 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note 30 wpm typing speed recommended
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students interested in learning Microsoft Word software.
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Basic preparation and document management

    Techniques to produce, format, edit and save documents in Word

    Customizing documents to add visual appeal

    Enhancing the presentation of text and graphics including macros and styles

    Organizing text in documents including sorting, creating outlines, forms and specialized tables

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in saving, printing, editing, formatting, and enhancing Word documents.

    Develop the ability and demonstrate proficiency in adding visual enhancements to documents appropriate to a business environment, such as: ClipArt images, WordArt text, drawn objects, borders, tabs and tables.

    Develop the ability and demonstrate proficiency in manipulating headers, footers, footnotes, endnotes and references.

    Demonstrate proficiency in preparing and merging data from documents to produce a final document appropriate for use in a business setting.

    Demonstrate proficiency in the use of styles, forms, quick parts and specialized tables in formatting a document for a business need.

    Understand and think critically when creating Word documents appropriate for use in a business setting.

    Be able to apply appropriate Word documents to business needs.

  
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    BSTEC 155 - Microsoft PowerPoint

    3 Credits
    Designed for the office professional who will use presentation software. Students will learn beginning to advanced features of the Microsoft PowerPoint program, including creating a presentation, applying and modifying text and graphics, using special effects in a slide show, integrating PowerPoint with other programs, applying special effects in presentations, and creating special types of presentations.

    Pre-requisite(s) ENGL 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students interested in learning Microsoft PowerPoint software.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Creating presentations

    Enhancing presentations with charts, graphs, pictures, animation, sound and movies

    Creating slide show presentation with special effects

    Integrating PowerPoint with other Microsoft products

    Applying advanced special effects in presentations

    Creating special types of presentations

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in managing PowerPoint presentations while working with multiple presentations

    Demonstrate basic and advanced proficiency in creating, saving, printing, editing, formatting and enhancing PowerPoint presentations

    Demonstrate proficiency in presenting a PowerPoint presentation in front of an audience.

    Demonstrate critical thinking skills regarding appropriate enhancements necessary in a PowerPoint presentation including charts, graphs, pictures, animations, sound and movies.

    Demonstrate proficiency in using appropriate steps in delivering a business appropriate PowerPoint presentation.

    Be able to apply appropriate PowerPoint presentations to business needs.

  
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    BSTEC 160 - Microsoft Outlook

    2 Credits
    Designed for the office professional who will use personal information management software. Students will learn to use e-mail, scheduling, contact lists, task lists, journals, tracking, notes, reminders and integration with other Microsoft software.

    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve BSTEC students and others interested in learning Outlook.
    Active Date 2015-07-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Email

    MS Outlook features including:

    - Contacts

    - Calendar

    - Scheduling

    - Tasks

    - Notes

    Customizing Outlook

    Integration of Outlook with other MS Products

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate use of Microsoft Outlook to create appointments, meetings, contacts, and email in a business setting.

    Demonstrate ability to integrate Microsoft Outlook with other Microsoft Office applications.

  
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    BSTEC 165 - Microsoft Excel

    5 Credits
    The student will gain the experience to work with Excel workbooks for common office business needs. The students will learn how to advance formulas and functions, insert tables, and create charts. Students will also learn how to create PivotTables and PivotCharts. Student will learn to manage multiple worksheets and workbooks, learn to use advanced filter, conditional formatting, sorting, and other advanced formatting features.

    Pre-requisite(s) READ 081 or BSTEC 105
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Basic computer knowledge highly suggested.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve BSTEC students and others interested in learning Excel.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    > Getting Started with Excel.

    > Formatting Workbook Text and Data.

    > Calculating Data with Formulas and Functions.

    > Analyzing and Charting Financial Data.

    > Creating Excel Tables, PivotTables, and PivotCharts.

    > Managing Multiple Worksheets and Workbooks.

    > Developing an Excel Application.

    > Working with Advanced Functions.
     

    Student Learning Outcomes
  
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    BSTEC 170 - Microsoft Access

    5 Credits
    This course is an introduction to intermediate to using Microsoft Access . The student will learn how to plan and create relational databases which includes: Creating and validating tables, Apply and enforce referential integrity between tables, Creating simple, filtered, and calculated queries, Create forms with related subforms, Create report with group subreports with calculated fields. Students will also learn how to manage the database and create backups. Students will also learn how to import and export data from other databases, spreadsheets, and text files.

    Pre-requisite(s) READ 081 or BSTEC 105
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Basic computer knowledge highly suggested.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve BSTEC students to satisfy Associate in Applied Science Degree requirements; and as an elective for students wishing to increase their understanding of Access and databases.
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    > Creating a Database.

    > Building a Database and Defining Table Relationships.

    > Maintaining and Querying a Database.

    > Creating Forms and Reports.

    > Creating Advanced Queries and Enhancing Table Design.

    > Using Form Tools and Creating Custom Forms.

    > Creating Custom Reports.

    > Sharing, Integrating, and Analyzing Data.

    Student Learning Outcomes
  
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    BSTEC 185 - Business Correspondence

    5 Credits
    Learn to write effective business correspondence using correct spelling, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary in business documents.

    Pre-requisite(s) READ 081 or BSTEC 105
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Basic computer skills and keyboarding experience recommended.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve For students that need to develop the necessary skills to work in an office environment.
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Proper usage of grammar, punctuation, spelling, capitalization, & vocabulary.

    - Proofreading and editing skills.

    - Procedures for producing and processing business messages.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students will be able to identify, correct, and apply proper usage of grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, & vocabulary.

    Students will be able to identify, correct, and apply proper proofreading and editing skills.

    Students will be able to produce and edit business messages in the correct format.

  
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    BSTEC 190 - Web Design

    5 Credits
    Introduction to Web design. Students will learn to design, develop and maintain personal and professional Webpages and Websites individually and in teams using HTML, CSS, and latest Web Authoring Software.

    Pre-requisite(s) READ 081 or BSTEC 105
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Recom: Basic computer and Internet knowledge and keyboarding skills.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Business Technology and others interested students in learning to design, develop and maintain web sites.
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Introduction to Web design. Students will learn to design, develop, and maintain personal and professional Web pages individually and in teams using HTML, CSS, and Web Authoring Software. Content for projects will be researched, evaluated, and applied based on criteria developed in the class. Students will learn how publish, optimize, and promote websites.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Build and Maintain web sites with limited interactive functionality.

    Develop a working knowledge of multimedia technologies and security issues.

    Develop and manage the creation and construction of web sites.

    Identify and evaluate target audiences for web sites.

    Understand and apply the elements of effective web design.

    Understand and explore publishing issues.

    Identify and explore ethical issues in web design.

    Create, save, and maintain web pages using HTML.

    Create, save, and maintain web pages using Web Authoring software

    Identify and Explore Web Site connectivity and linking issues.

  
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    BSTEC 195 - Social Media for Business

    5 Credits
    This class will provide the knowledge how to setup small business on Social Media sites, includes Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and Twitter. The student will learn the importance of Social Media for businesses. Students will learn how to create individual and group pages, identifying audience, posting and replying to messages, setting up events, and working with additional supported applications. Students will learn how to incorporate sharing pages on other pages and websites.

    Pre-requisite(s) READ 081 and BSTEC 105
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve For students who needs to develop the necessary skills to setup small businesses on the social media.
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    History of Social Media

    The Growth of Social Media

    How Social Media effects our daily lives

    Setting Up Facebook Pages: Individual, Group, and Like pages

    Using Facebook applications: Individual and Facebook Pages.

    Creating Gmail account for Google+

    Setting up Business on Google+

    Setting up LinkedIn account for business

    Creating group on LinkedIn

    Setting up Twitter for business

    Searching for new emerging Social Media Technologies

    Assessing what other Social Media is good for a business
     

    Student Learning Outcomes
  
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    BSTEC 215 - Microsoft Visio

    3 Credits
    Teaches students the basic functions and features of Microsoft Visio. Students will learn to work with stencils, objects, flowcharts and master shapes. They will learn how to connect shapes, enter and format text and set file properties. Covers background pages, detail pages and the print preview function.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 105
    Course Note Recom: Computer and Internet knowledge and keyboarding
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Business Technology students, as well as students from other programs planning to work in a business setting.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Exploring the Visio environment

    2. Drawing Tools

    3. Creating basic diagrams

    4. Formatting Drawings

    5. Working with Pages

    6. Creating and setting up a new draw

    7. Creating network and brainstorming diagrams

    8. Creating technical layouts

    9. Advanced custom shape design

    10. Business diagrams

    11. Network diagrams and Web site mapping

    12. Software and database diagrams

    13. Templates

    14. Integrating Visio with other applications
     

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students will demonstrate proficiency with many advanced features of Microsoft Visio software. They will be able to draw and format advanced diagrams and flowcharts layouts. The students will be able to create floor maps and office layouts. The students will be able to integrate Excel and Access software to produce Visio documents.

    Students will demonstrate proficiency in drawing and reshaping objects to increase understanding of complicated information within the diagram.

    Student will have the knowledge of the basic structure as well as design and draw a flowchart using shapes, connectors and test features.

    Student will gain the knowledge of the theory behind and properly utilize various text formatting options.

    Student will develop the ability to create network diagrams using layers, complex shapes, background pages, links and formulas.

    Student will show how to think critically regarding when to use flow charting software to increase understanding of complex information.

    Student will demonstrate critical thinking skills when integrating Visio with other applications.

  
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    BSTEC 225 - Microsoft Project

    3 Credits
    Teaches Microsoft Project project-management software.

    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Business Technology, Business, or other students who will use MS Project to manage projects.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Project Basics

    Establishing Resources

    Resource and Task Assignments

    Refining your Project Schedule

    Fine-Tuning Tasks

    Fine-Tuning Resources

    Project Information: Sorting, Grouping, and Filtering

    Project Schedule Formatting Fundamentals

    Project Schedule Tracking Fundamentals

    Project Reporting

    Integrating Project with other programs

    Project Schedule Optimization

    Advanced Project Schedule Formatting

    Managing Multiple Projects

    Working with Resource Pools

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate the ability to set up a new project, establish resources, manage resource and task assignments, manage the project schedule, and generate project reports using the Microsoft Project software.

    Demonstrate the ability to integrate Microsoft Project with other Microsoft Office applications.

  
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    BSTEC 230 - MS SharePoint for Office

    5 Credits
    This course is to provide students with the experience how to work with Microsoft SharePoint in office settings. In this class, students will learn how to create basic web pages with SharePoint and how to integrate and share MS Office documents and files among company server platform.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 105
    Course Note Microsoft Office knowledge is highly recommended and completing BSTEC 190 or experience in Web Design
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve BSTEC Students and those who wanted to increase their skills to work more efficient in office setting with SharePoint
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Introduction to SharePoint

    2. Working with SharePoint Online Sites

    3. Working with SharePoint Web Pages

    4. Use SharePoint to connect with your community

    5. Managing work tasks

    6. Working with workflows

    7. Using SharePoint with Excel and Access

    8. Using SharePoint with Outlook and Lync

    9. Working with content management

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students will classify the work with SharePoint to organize content of web pages on website. Students will learn to integrate Microsoft Office applications with SharePoint and share information among the community (business). Students will learn how to manage documents and finding information and people.

  
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    BSTEC 240 - Internship

    5 Credits
    The internship provides an opportunity for students to combine classroom theory with practical work experience. Experience gained in the workplace is related to the student’s field of study or career goals.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 139 and concurrent enrollment in BSTEC 241.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students in Business Technology programs or related fields.
    Active Date 2015-04-09

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 150 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 150
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Practical experience working in a business office doing administrative assistant, bookkeeping or office management duties under supervision.

    2. Networking for professional growth.

    3. Career development or exploration through work experience.

    4. Successful work habits and attitude.

    5. Interpersonal communication skills.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Perform assigned duties to meet or exceed internship objectives that are documented and agreed upon by the internship supervisor, faculty supervisor, and student intern.

    Practice using business technology skills in the workplace.

  
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    BSTEC 241 - Internship Seminar

    1 Credits
    Weekly classroom seminars designed to enhance the practical experiences of the business information technology internship. Feedback and discussion on pertinent work issues, including ethics, office politics, delegation, asking for help, networking and identifying future career goals.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 139 and concurrent enrollment in BSTEC 240.
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students in Business Technology classes and programs.
    Active Date 2015-04-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 26
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 11
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    1. Ethics in a professional office setting practice

    2. Office politics

    3. Office dynamics

    4. Enhancing and developing business information technology skills through practical experience

    5. Networking

    6. Future career goals

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Apply classroom theory and personal experience to common workplace scenarios through graded discussion.

  
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    BSTEC 260 - Integrated Office Management

    5 Credits
    Based on previously learned Microsoft Office Skills, students will work in team-based projects to learn how to integrate Microsoft Office application to produce and support small and large projects. In this course, the student will grow in terms of software understanding, personal marketability, and developing greater confidence in their ability to manage applications. In the course, the student will have a better understanding of business works, including its departmental structure, guidelines for dealing with people, modern office equipment overview, scheduling appointments, and planning meetings.

    Pre-requisite(s) BSTEC 105
    Course Note Recom: Completing or have extensive knowledge in Micorosoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access)
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Students who want to improve their computer skills using Microsoft Office with application in business situations and to develop the necessary skills to work successfully in an office environment.
    Active Date 2015-04-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Individually and in teams, students build their Microsoft Office skills through the realistic, engaging integrated projects. Microsoft Office projects offers meaningful exercises in each of the four main Office applications - Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Students will learn to produce a variety of viable, real-life documents, such as resumes, business cards, budgets, presentations, and more through easy-to-follow steps, large screen shots, and images of completed projects. The students will learn how better in a business environment by working in project-based teams and produce quality report and procedures.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Student will develop skills to integrate Microsoft Office applications to produce advanced documents, such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access. Student will gain the skills to learn how to work and moderate teams. They will gain knowledge to work in a business environment. They will be able to apply good work ethics in a business setting.

  
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    BSTEC 281 - Special Topics

    1 Credits
    Special topics in business technology.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the Business Technology department who are pursuing degrees or certificates in the area of administrative management, administrative assistant and related fields; other students who desire skills in particular areas of business technology.
    Active Date 2015-01-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 11
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Introduction
    - Relevance to Business Technology
    - Substantive presentation
    - Integration into existing systems
    - Application

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Develop, practice and apply new skills.

    Demonstrate knowledge of new applications.

    Interpret and integrate new skills into existing knowledge in the area of business technology.

  
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    BSTEC 282 - Special Topics

    2 Credits
    Special topics in business technology.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the Business Technology department who are pursuing degrees or certificates in the area of administrative management, administrative assistant and related fields; other students who desire skills in particular areas of business technology.
    Active Date 2015-01-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 11
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Introduction
    - Relevance to Business Technology
    - Substantive presentation
    - Integration into existing systems
    - Application

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Develop, practice and apply new skills.

    Demonstrate knowledge of new applications.

    Interpret and integrate new skills into existing knowledge in the area of business technology.

  
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    BSTEC 283 - Special Topics

    3 Credits
    Special topics in business technology.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the Business Technology department who are pursuing degrees or certificates in the area of administrative management, administrative assistant and related fields; other students who desire skills in particular areas of business technology.
    Active Date 2015-01-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Introduction
    - Relevance to Business Technology
    - Substantive presentation
    - Integration into existing systems
    - Application

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Develop, practice and apply new skills.

    Demonstrative knowledge of new applications.

    Interpret and integrate new skills into existing knowledge in the area of business technology.

  
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    BSTEC 284 - Special Topics

    4 Credits
    Special topics in business technology.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the Business Technology department who are pursuing degrees or certificates in the area of administrative management, administrative assistant and related fields; other students who desire skills in particular areas of business and technology.
    Active Date 2015-01-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 44
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Introduction
    - Relevance to Business Technology
    - Substantive presentation
    - Integration in existing systems
    - Application

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Develop, practice and apply new skills.

    Demonstrate knowledge of new applications.

    Interpret and integrate new skills into existing knowledge in the area of business technology.

  
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    BSTEC 285 - Special Topics

    5 Credits
    Special topics in business technology.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in the Business Technology department who are pursuing degrees or certificates in the area of administrative management, administrative assistant and related fields; other students who desire skills in particular areas of business and technology.
    Active Date 2015-01-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    - Introduction
    - Relevance to Business Technology
    - Substantive presentation
    - Integration into existing systems
    - Application

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Develop, practice and apply new skills.

    Demonstrate knowledge of new applications.

    Interpret and integrate new skills into existing knowledge in the area business technology.

  
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    BSTEC 295 - Special Topics

    5 Credits
    An individual study project developed by student and instructor in an area approved by the instructor.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Principally designed for the student wishing in-depth knowledge in a part or parts of a subject.
    Active Date 2015-06-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 10
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 275
    Total Contact Hours 275
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    To be determined between the instructor and student.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate basic to thorough knowledge of the area investigated dependent upon the number of credits involved.

    Demonstrate ability to outline a set of goals and objectives aimed at increasing knowledge and skills in a specific area of Business Technology.

    Demonstrate ability to pursue a series of self-directed goals and objectives.


Career Studies

  
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    CARER 101 - Individualized Career Exploration

    1 Credits
    Individualized instruction designed to explore values, interests and skills as well as discover career planning resources and possible career options.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees KW

    Designed to Serve All students desiring to identify a career path or college major.
    Active Date 2011-06-13

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 8
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 15
    Total Contact Hours 15
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Assessment: MBTI, Strong Interest Inventory,WOIS, Career Assessment Inventory; Informational Interview; Write a Resume; Develop a list of Career Goals; Prepare an Academic Plan; Career and Life Planning Summary Sheet.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. To identify values, interests and skills.

    2. To increase self-awareness of career strengths and possibilities.

    3. To increase knowledge of the world of work.

    4. To utilize career planning resources.

    5. To write a career and educational plan.

  
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    CARER 110 - Career Planning and Self-Evaluation

    2 Credits
    Designed for students exploring career and educational options for the first time or changing career directions. Emphasis on assessment, personal styles, the career marketplace and job search skills.

    Fees KW

    Designed to Serve New and/or returning students to Highline Community College. Current students who are having difficulty determining educational or career goals. Prospective students returning for training, career preparation, or mid-life career changes.
    Active Date 2013-06-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 22 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 22
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Career Life Line, Interests, Skills, Work and Personal Styles, Personality Styles, Job Satisfiers/Motivators, Inventory Interpretations, Decision Making, Occupational Research, Educational Planning, Worker Interviews, Resume Writing, Job Hunting, Future World of Work.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1 To identify interest patterns, abilities and skills, and work related values

    2. To accurately research current information and data on possible careers resulting in a tentative career choice or list of related occupations

    3. To identify individual decision making styles and select a tentative career choice

    4. To determine appropriate experiences to test out the feasibility of a tentative career choice

    5. To devise effective job search skills and demonstrate proper interview techniques and written materials

  
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    CARER 291 - Special Topics

    1 Credits
    This course is individualized and the subject matter varies. Course is tied in to workshops and Career Center programs focused on career exploration and decision-making activities.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students exploring college majors and career options.
    Active Date 2011-07-25

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 19
    Contact Hours: Lecture 11 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 11
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Individual contract with instructor to explore college majors and topics related to the world of work.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Individualized contract with Instructor to cover topics related to choosing a college major and career options.

  
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    CARER 295 - Special Topics

    1 Credits
    Student-instructor designed contract for special studies of topic related to career exploration and development.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees CF

    Designed to Serve Women students entering the college through the Work-First program.
    Active Date 2011-07-25

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 39
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 275
    Total Contact Hours 275
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    See topics below:

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. To identify talents, abilities and functional transferable skills.

    2. To explore work related values.

    3. To assess interest patterns.

    4. To gather current information and data of careers.

    5. To explore job search skills.

    6. To develop a career ladder and accomplish next step planning.

    7. To write a resume.

    8. To participate in a mock-interview.

    9. To review basic skills.

    10. To develop and update technology skills.


Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHEM 290 - Special Studies

    5 Credits
    An individual or group project or special topic course in an area approved by the instructor.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students desiring to study areas of chemistry not covered by the regular courses.
    Active Date 2012-06-25

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-5
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 275
    Total Contact Hours 275
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    The outline can be created at the discretion of the instructor and will vary with the special topic.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Mastery of advanced or special topic area.

    2. Success in advanced or special laboratory projects.

    3. Self-directed study.

    4. Ability to work with others.

  
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    CHEM& 110 - Chemical Concepts with Lab

    5 Credits
    An introduction to chemistry intended for students not majoring in science, this course presents general ideas about how models of atoms, bonding and the structures of materials help in the understanding of chemical properties and reactions. Also presents a selection of applications chosen from topics such as energy and environment, foods, drugs, poisons and household chemicals. One credit of laboratory is included.

    Pre-requisite(s) MATH 081
    Placement Eligibility Math 091 or higher
    Course Note Previously CHEM 110.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Students who are not science majors but are interested in a lab course in basic and applied chemical concepts.
    Active Date 2013-06-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Course context and organization may be adapted to fit the instructor and text. Generally, content will be divided into fundamental topics and applied topics. These may be organized in a fundamentals-first format or with fundamentals introduced as needed to serve a chosen applied topic list. Essential fundamentals (always included)are atomic theory, bonding, and acids and bases. Optional fundamentals include nuclear chemistry, mass relationships, and oxidation-reduction. Applications are selected by the instructor (optionally with input from students). Typical options include chemical resources and the earth, chemistry and the environment, energy and fuels, foods, drugs, poisons, and household chemicals. Below is a sample fundamentals-first outline. 1. Chemistry as a science 2. Atomic theory 3. Nuclear reactions(optional) 4. Bonding 5. Types of reactions 6. Selected applications

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Understand fundamental chemistry concepts of microscopic structures.

    Recognize chemical principles involved in common applications.

    Understand the role of chemistry in social, health, economic, and environmental issues.

    Use laboratory methods to observe chemical properties.

  
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    CHEM& 121 - Introduction to Chemistry

    5 Credits
    Introductory inorganic chemistry course intended for students in health science programs or preparing for general chemistry. Subjects include science and measurement; atomic, ionic and molecular structures; naming chemicals; quantitative relationships within compounds and in reactions; gas laws; solutions; acids and bases; and nuclear reactions and radiation. One credit of laboratory is included.

    Pre-requisite(s) MATH 091
    Placement Eligibility Math 107, 111, 146, 180, 098
    Course Note Previously CHEM 121.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Students majoring in allied health fields (dental hygiene, nursing, ultrasound technician, etc.).
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:12

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Topics include:

    1. Science and chemistry
    2. Matter, measurements, and calculations
    3. Basic atomic structure and atomic masses
    4. Electron configuration, atomic properties, and the periodic law
    5. Compounds, formulas, and nomenclature
    6. Bonding, molecular structure, and intermolecular forces
    7. Chemical reactions and reaction amounts
    8. Solutions, colloids, and solution concentrations
    9. Acids, bases, and salts
    10. Nuclear reactions and effects and uses of radiation


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Explain and apply scientific reasoning to chemical principles.

    Perform measurements and calculations with chemical amounts and metric units.

    Relate atomic electron configurations to the periodic law and chemical reactivity.

    Name and distinguish between different types of inorganic compounds.

    Explain bonding, molecular structures, polarity and how they affect the physical and chemical properties of different compounds.

    Recognize and balance various types of reactions (redox, acid/base, etc…) and calculate stoichiometric quantities.

    Be able to give reactants or products for radioactive decays.

    Perform measurements and observations using basic laboratory techniques.

  
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    CHEM& 131 - Introduction to Organic/Biochemistry

    5 Credits
    An introductory organic chemistry course that fulfills the organic and biochemistry requirements for health science programs. Topics include molecular structures and bonding; functional group nomenclature, properties and reactions; and an introduction to biochemical compounds and reaction pathways. One credit of laboratory is included.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHEM& 121 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHEM 122.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Students majoring in allied health fields (dental hygiene, nursing, ultrasound technician, etc.).
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:15

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    The content may be organized to match a text or instructor’s conception of a logical order. Content includes naming, structure, bonding, and chemical reactivity of organic molecules containing functional groups such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, esters, ethers, amines, and amides. Biologically relevant molecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes will also be introduced and their involvement in biochemical pathways will be emphasized.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Categorize and classify functional groups of common organic molecules.

    Draw and name functional groups of common organic molecules.

    Accurately predict physical properties of common organic molecules.

    Accurately predict the chemical reactivity and products of common organic molecules.

    Identify chiral objects, molecules, and carbon atoms.

    Recognize, draw, and classify common biomolecules and their building blocks: carbohydrates (mono, oligo, and polysaccharides), lipids (triglycerides, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and steroids), proteins, and nucleotides.

    Describe the formation and reactions of common biomolecules.

    Describe how common biomolecules function in the human body.

    Employ common practices in the organic chemistry laboratory.

    Explain reasons for effectiveness or ineffectiveness of experiments in the organic chemistry laboratory.

  
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    CHEM& 139 - General Chemistry Preparation

    5 Credits
    Intended to prepare students for success in general chemistry. Emphasis on the development of learning strategies for descriptive and quantitative subject matter. Skill development in writing, memorization, visual models, calculators, proportional math and graphing will be applied to preparatory chemistry topics, including the development of atomic theory; electron configurations; bonding; chemical nomenclature; Lewis models; molecular geometries and properties; chemical amounts; empirical formulas; stoichiometry; and solution concentrations.

    Pre-requisite(s) MATH 091 or higher
    Placement Eligibility Math 107, 111, 146, 180, 098
    Course Note Previously CHEM 150.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Students planning to enroll in CHEM& 161 without prior college-preparatory chemistry.
    Active Date 2011-06-13

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Topics may vary as instructors choose them to fit learning skills. They may include the following, not necessarily in this order. 1. Introduction to Science and Chemistry (Defining terms) 2. Atomic Theory (Drawing conclusions form experiments) 3. Electron Configurations (Modeling) 4. Atomic Properties (Relating models to observable properties) 5. Bonding and Classes of Materials (Modeling) 6. Naming Compounds (Memorization and following syntax rules) 7. Lewis Models and the VSEPR Theory (Multi-step models) 8. Intermolecular forces and material properties (Relating models to observable properties, synthesis of concepts) 9. Scientific Calculators (Calculator usage) 10. Measurement and Units (Proportional math) 11. Speed and Energy of Light (Simple algebra and variable symbols) 12. Atomic Mass and the Mole (Proportional math) 13. Empirical Formulas (Finding proportions) 14. Reactions and Stochiometry (Finding and using proportions) 15. Solution Concentrations (Cumulative problem solving) 16. Gas Laws (if time allows) (Direct and inverse proportions)

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Will be reflective regarding the learning process.

    Will understand fundamental concepts of the topics listed above.

    Will be able to problem solve quantitatively.

    Will be able to preform descriptive and operational problem solving.

    Will be able to work with others.

    Will be able to do self-directed study.

  
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    CHEM& 161 - General Chemistry with Lab I

    5 Credits


    General chemistry for science and engineering majors. This first course in a three-quarter sequence includes the scientific method; quantitative measurements; nomenclature; determining chemical formulas, reactions; calculations of reaction masses and enthalpy changes; solution reactions; theories of atomic structure; electron configurations and atomic properties; and bonding classes and theories of bonding in molecules. One credit of laboratory is included.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHEM& 121 min 1.5 or CHEM& 139 min 1.5
    Course Note Students who took one year of high school chemistry and have placement into math 098+ OR took half a year of high school chemistry and placement into math 142 can request an entry code for access to this class, in lieu of the prerequisite course.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Students majoring in a physical, life, or health science, or engineering.
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:17

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Topics will include the following, not necessarily in this order, with laboratory work paralleling lecture content.

    1. Chemistry as a Science

    2. Measurement and Units

    3. Basic Atomic Theory

    4. Compounds and Nomenclature

    5. Formula Determination and Stoichiometry

    6. Reactions in Solutions

    7. Solution Stoichiometry

    8. Enthalpy Change and Reactions

    9. Electron structure in Atoms

    10. Electron Configurations

    11. Patterns in Atomic Properties

    12. Ionic, Covalent, and Metallic Bonding

    13. Molecular structure 14. Bond Theories and Bond Properties

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Properly perform laboratory operations to obtain and process data to arrive at conclusions.

    2. Accurately explain the fundamental concepts of general chemistry themes.

    3. Accurately solve problems using quantitative methods.

    4. Accurately perform descriptive and operational problem solving based on a given theory.

    5. Work effectively with others and communicate effectively in writing and orally.

  
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    CHEM& 162 - General Chemistry with Lab II

    5 Credits
    General chemistry for science and engineering majors. The second course in a three-quarter sequence includes gas laws; intermolecular forces; properties of pure liquids and solids; crystal structures; concentration units and physical properties of solutions; equilibrium; acid-base theory and equilibrium applications; chemical thermodynamics; and electrochemistry. One credit of laboratory is included.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHEM& 161 min 1.5
    Course Note MATH& 141 recommended. Previously CHEM 152.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Students majoring in physical, life, or health sciences, or engineering.
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:26

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Topics will include the following, not necessarily in this order, with laboratory work paralleling lecture content.

    1. Gas Laws and Kinetic-Molecular Theory
    2. Intermolecular Forces and Properties of Pure Liquids and Solids
    3. Crystal Structures
    4. The Dissolving Process
    5. Concentration Units
    6. Solution Stoichiometry
    7. Colligative Properties of Solutions
    8. Equilibrium
    9. Le Chatelier’s Principle
    10.  Acid-Base Theory
    11. Acid-Base Equilibria and pH Calculations
    12. Buffers and pH during Titrations
    13. Chemical Thermodynamics
    14. Electrochemistry


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Properly perform laboratory operations to obtain and process data to arrive at conclusions.

    Accurately explain the fundamental concepts of general chemistry themes.

    Accurately solve problems using quantitative methods.

    Accurately perform descriptive and operational problem solving based on a given theory.

    Work effectively with others and communicate effectively in writing and orally.

    6. Will be able to do self-directed study.

  
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    CHEM& 163 - General Chemistry with Lab III

    5 Credits
    General chemistry for science and engineering majors. The third course in a three-quarter sequence includes chemical kinetics; nuclear reactions, descriptive chemistry of representative elements; transition metal properties; complex ions and coordination compounds; solubility and complex-ion equilibria; introductory organic chemistry; and an introduction to biomolecules. One credit of laboratory is included.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHEM& 162 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHEM 153.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Students majoring in physical, life, or health sciences, or engineering.
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:28

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 44 Lab 22 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 66
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Topics will include the following, not necessarily in this order, with laboratory work paralleling lecture content.

    1. Factors that affect reaction rates
    2. Rate Laws, Collision Theory, and Mechanisms
    3. Nuclear Stability and Reactivity
    4. Chemical Applications of Radioactivity
    5. Review of Electron Configurations and Atomic Properties
    6. The Periodic Law and Diagonal Relationships
    7. Acid-Base Character of Oxides and Hydroxides
    8. Representative Metals and Nonmetals
    9. Transition Metal Properties
    10. Complex lons and the Spectrochemical Series
    11. Solubility and Complex lon Formation Equilibria
    12. Introduction to Organic Chemistry
    13. Introduction to Biomolecules
    14. Special Topics or projects if time allows at the discretion of the instructor


    Student Learning Outcomes
    Properly perform laboratory operations to obtain and process data to arrive at conclusions.

    Accurately explain the fundamental concepts of general chemistry themes.

    Accurately solve problems using quantitative methods.

    Accurately perform descriptive and operational problem solving based on a given theory.

    Work effectively with others and communicate effectively in writing and orally.

  
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    CHEM& 261 - Organic Chemistry with Lab I

    5 Credits
    Organic chemistry for science and engineering majors. The first course in a three-quarter sequence includes molecular structure, bonding, nomenclature and reactivity of hydrocarbons and alkyl halides; an introduction to reaction mechanisms; stereochemistry; nucleophilic substitution; and elimination reactions. Laboratory includes an introduction to fundamental methods and techniques used for the preparation and characterization of organic molecules.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHEM& 163 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHEM 201 and CHEM 204.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Science and Engineering majors and pre-professional (dental, pharmacy, optometry, medical, medical technician, chiropractic, dietetics, and veterinary medicine) students.
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:31

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 44 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 77
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Typical content includes molecular structure and bonding, resonance structures, acid-base chemistry, functional group nomenclature and chemistry, mechanisms and reactive intermediates (kinetics and thermodynamnics of), stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution & elimination reactions. Fundamental laboratory methods and theory include melting-point determination, distillation, refluxing, extraction, separation, and other methods commonly used in the organic chemistry laboratory including functional group and molecular structure determination.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Apply the fundamentals of molecular structure and bonding to determine physical and chemical properties of organic molecules.

    Identify and draw common functional groups of organic molecules.

    Apply fundamental concepts of acid and base chemistry to organic molecules and reactions.

    Assess the fundamental concepts of kinetics and thermodynamics to predict products of organic reactions.

    Apply primary concepts behind nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions to predict the outcome of a reaction.

    Use basic skills in the organic chemistry laboratory to work collaboratively with others.

  
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    CHEM& 262 - Organic Chemistry with Lab II

    5 Credits
    Continuation of CHEM& 261. The second course in a three-quarter sequence includes structures, reactions, mechanisms and preparation of molecules containing specific functional groups. Includes an introduction to instrumental analysis of organic molecules. Laboratory continues the application of methods and skills used to prepare and characterize organic molecules.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHEM& 261 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHEM 202 and CHEM 205.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Science and Engineering majors and pre-professional (dental, pharmacy, optometry, medical, medical technician, chiropractic, dietetics, and veterinary medicine) students.
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:33

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 44 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 77
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Varies by instructor. Typical content is likely to include elimination reactions, multi-step synthesis, the chemistry of alkenes, alkynes and aromatic compounds as well as the theory and practice of using infrared spectroscopy (IR), mass spectrometry (MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the elucidation of molecular structure. Laboratory methods, skills, and theory include the synthesis, purification and characterization of organic molecules using common methods such as distillation, refluxing, extraction, and chromatography followed by analysis using IR and/or NMR methods.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Describe the formation and predict the reactivity of alcohols, ethers, and epoxides, dienes, and aromatic compounds.

    Describe the mechanism of the formation and reactions of alcohols, ethers, and epoxides, dienes, and aromatic compounds.

    Outline plausible multi-step synthesis of target organic molecules that involve alcohols, ethers, and epoxides, dienes, and aromatic compounds.

    Evaluate relative physical properties of alcohols, ethers, and epoxides, dienes, and aromatic compounds.

    Effectively use instrumental analysis (IR, MS, NMR) for the elucidation of molecular structure.

    Demonstrate fundamental skills used by the organic chemist to synthesize and characterize molecules in the laboratory.

    Explain reasons for effectiveness or ineffectiveness of experiments in the organic chemistry lab.

  
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    CHEM& 263 - Organic Chemistry with Lab III

    5 Credits
    Continuation of CHEM& 262. The third course in a three-quarter sequence includes further study in the synthesis, reactivity and properties of molecules containing a variety of functional groups, including the structure, function and reactivity of biologically relevant molecules. Laboratory will emphasize synthesis and instrumental analysis of target molecules.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHEM& 262 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHEM 203 and CHEM 206.
    Fees CL

    Designed to Serve Science and Engineering majors and pre-professional (dental, pharmacy, optometry, medical, medical technician, chiropractic, dietetics, and veterinary medicine) students.
    Active Date 20170622T08:37:36

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 24
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 44 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 77
    Degree Distributions: AA Science, Science Lab
    Course Outline
    Varies by instructor. Typical content is likely to include the preparation and reactivity of functional groups used in multi-step molecular synthesis. The course will also emphasize the structure, function, and reactivity of synthetically useful and/or biologically relevant molecules. The formation and chemical reactivity of functional groups such as conjugated alkenes, aromatic compounds, carboxylic acids, ketones, esters, amines, and amides will be emphasized. Laboratory methods, skills, and theory include the synthesis, purification and characterization of organic molecules using common methods such as distillation, refluxing, extraction, and chromatography followed by analysis using IR and/or NMR.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Describe the mechanism of the formation and reactions aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids, and carboxylic acid derivatives.

    Outline plausible multi-step synthesis of target organic molecules that involve aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids, and carboxylic acid derivatives.

    Evaluate relative physical properties of aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids, and carboxylic acid derivatives.

    Describe the formation and predict the reactivity common biomolecules: carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins.

    Correctly use instrumental analysis (IR, MS, NMR) for the elucidation of molecular structure.

    Demonstrate fundamental skills used by the organic chemist to synthesize and characterize molecules in the laboratory.

    Explain reasons for effectiveness or ineffectiveness of experiments in the organic chemistry lab.


Chinese

  
  •  

    CHIN& 121 - Chinese I

    5 Credits
    A comprehensive beginning Chinese course, which includes instruction and practice in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

    Course Note Previously CHIN 101.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement. Students interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2015-02-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    Pinyin and the four tones Word order Word formation Asking questions Numbers and measure words Dates and time words Negative statements Word collocation Basic Chinese strokes and radicals Introduction to Chinese culture

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students demonstrate oral proficiency in Chinese with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking, and understanding.

    Students demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structures.

    Students demonstrate ability to read and write in Chinese.

    Students demonstrate an understanding of Chinese-speaking cultures and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Students demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.

  
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    CHIN& 122 - Chinese II

    5 Credits
    A comprehensive beginning Chinese course, which includes instruction and practice in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHIN& 121 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHIN 102.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement. Students interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2014-04-24

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 30
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    word order word collocation idiomatic expressions vocabulary building conditional sentences asking information questions describing objects, people, and problems giving advice expressing wishes, preferences, and opinions making comparisons introduction to Chinese festivals

    Student Learning Outcomes
  
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    CHIN& 123 - Chinese III

    5 Credits
    A comprehensive beginning Chinese course, which includes instruction and practice in all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHIN& 122 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHIN 103.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Transfer students who need to fulfill a language requirement; students needing Humanities distribution credits; students interested in languages and cultures.
    Active Date 2014-04-24

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    word order word collocation idiomatic expressions particles transitional words and expressions 4-character idioms vocabulary building measure words writing Chinese characters introduction to Chinese culture

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students demonstrate oral proficiency in Chinese with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking, and understanding.

    Students demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structures.

    Students demonstrate ability to read and write in Chinese.

    Students demonstrate an understanding of Chinese-speaking cultures and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Students demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.

  
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    CHIN& 221 - Chinese IV

    5 Credits
    Complete review of grammar and increased conversation; reading short pieces of literature increasingly complex; and writing assignments on varied topics. Includes history and/or culture.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHIN& 123 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHIN 201.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve For those who completed Chinese 123 or its equivalent; or permission of the instructor.
    Active Date 2015-11-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    Descriptive/Potential complements describing the subject
    Interrogative pronouns appearing in statements
    Variances in expressing the duration of an action
    Passive-voice sentences
    Making comparisons
    Reading and discussing passages orally in Chinese.
    Discussing Chinese idioms and poems
    Introduction to Chinese Culture

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in speaking Chinese with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking and understanding.

    Demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structures.

    Demonstrate an ability to read and write in Chinese.

    Demonstrate an understanding of Chinese-speaking culture and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.

  
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    CHIN& 222 - Chinese V

    5 Credits
    Complete review of grammar and increased conversation; reading short pieces of literature increasingly complex; and writing assignments on varied topics. Includes history and/or culture.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHIN& 221 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHIN 202.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve For those who completed Chinese 221 or its equivalent; or permission of the instructor.
    Active Date 2011-08-08

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    Word order in Chinese Existential sentences Topic sentences Position of time phrases Resultative/Descriptive/Directional complements Chinese Numerical series Reading and discussing passage orally in Chinese. Retelling story or the gist of articles in Students’ own words. Discussing Chinese idioms and poems Assigned Compositions Introduction to Chinese Culture

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in speaking Chinese with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking and understanding.

    Demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structures.

    Demonstrate an ability to read and write in Chinese.

    Demonstrate an understanding of Chinese-speaking culture and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.

  
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    CHIN& 223 - Chinese VI

    5 Credits
    Complete review of grammar and increased conversation; reading short pieces of literature increasingly complex; and writing assignments on varied topics. Includes history and/or culture.

    Pre-requisite(s) CHIN& 222 min 1.5
    Course Note Previously CHIN 203.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve For those who completed Chinese 222 or its equivalent; or permission of the instructor.
    Active Date 2011-08-08

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    Directional complements indicating results Rhetorical Questions Cohesive devices Interrogative pronouns used for non-interrogative purposes. ba structure Reading and discussing passage orally in Chinese. Retelling story or the gist of articles in Students’ own words. Assigned Compositions Introduction to Chinese Culture

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate proficiency in speaking Chinese with emphasis on pronunciation, speaking and understanding.

    Demonstrate an ability to use basic grammatical structures.

    Demonstrate an ability to read and write in Chinese.

    Demonstrate an understanding of Chinese-speaking culture and their relationship with English-speaking U.S. culture.

    Demonstrate awareness of the importance of effective communication in an increasingly global society.


College Studies

  
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    COL 098 - HSC College Success Seminar

    3 Credits
    Helps students better understand the college experience and develop tools for academic and personal success. Topics include study skills, goal setting, college policies and resources, academic and career planning, time management, relationships and self-empowerment, and discussing controversial issues and topics. Some class sections will focus on a special theme or introduce students to particular majors/career fields.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This course is designed for students in the high school completion program. COL 098 will be particularly helpful for students new to higher education and/or lacking in proper preparation for academic success.
    Active Date 2014-09-03

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    I. Introduction to the course II. What is college all about? What must you know and do? III. Highline Community College: Policies and Resources IV. Understanding ourselves and our goals: Planning for success V. Study skills and time management VI. Using this information on a daily basis VII. What transferrable skills will help you excel in all of your courses? VIII. Why is your ability to communicate effectively about issues/topics important?

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate an understanding of the policies and resources at Highline.

    Show awareness of self,academic and career goals, and an ability to plan for success.

    Demonstrate an ability to develop meaningful relationships with faculty members and their peers for a healthy academic support structure.

    Demonstrate an ability to use study and time management skills effectively.

    In themed sections: Show knowledge of issues which are the focus of the course section and/or potential majors/career fields.

    Communicate topics and issues effectively in a multi-cultural classroom setting that propels the learning in the classroom

    Provide sound and logical reasoning to support arguments orally and written

  
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    COL 100 - College Success Seminar

    3 Credits
    Helps students better understand the college experience and develop tools for academic and personal success. Topics include study skills, goal setting, college policies and resources, academic and career planning, time management, relationships and self-empowerment. Some class sections will focus on a special theme or introduce students to particular majors/career fields. This course may be offered at 1, 2 or 3 credits, and course elements will vary depending on the number of credits.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve This course is designed to benefit all students. COL 100 will be particularly helpful for students new to higher education and/or lacking in proper preparation for academic success.
    Active Date 2014-05-07

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Class Limit 25
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    I. Introduction to the course II. What is college all about? What must you know and do? III. Highline Community College: Policies and Resources IV. Understanding ourselves and our goals: Planning for success V. Study skills and time management VI. Using this information on a daily basis

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate an understanding of the policies and resources at Highline.

    Show awareness of self,academic and career goals, and an ability to plan for success.

    Demonstrate an ability to develop meaningful relationships with faculty members and their peers for a healthy academic support structure.

    Demonstrate an ability to use study and time management skills efectively.

    In themed sections: Show knowledge of issues which are the focus of the course section and/or potential majors/career fields.

  
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    COL 200 - TRIO Summer Bridge

    3 Credits
    Students participate in instruction based, interactive and group learning activities that support building their academic, transfer, community support and financial literacy competencies preparing them to successfully transfer.

    Fees 

    Designed to Serve TRIO requests that the Summer Bridge program serve current HCC students enrolled in TRIO. TRIO serves students that are first-generation, low-income and students that have documented disabilities. TRIO students intend to transfer to 4-year colleges. Our intention is to assist these students in preparing to transition and transfer on to a 4-year college.
    Active Date 2012-07-24

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Variable Credit Yes Range 1-3
    Class Limit 33
    Contact Hours: Lecture 33 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 33
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    This three-week Summer Bridge course is designed to introduce TRiO students to tools to further writing development and enhance the college experience while at Highline. The course will provide an opportunity for students to explore college success strategies, build community and develop the skills necessary to become a master student. Specific emphasis will be placed on identity development, campus resources, success strategies, study skills, transfer information and cross cultural communication. Provide instruction to familiarize students with the transfer process and assign the mandatory documents students will need to successfully transfer. Week 1: -Demonstrate knowledge of college success skills such as time management, educational planning, study skills and utilizing resources. -Identify personal values and unique skills/qualities and apply these towards academic and career goals. -Plan for transfer to 4-year institutions by researching schools and programs/majors and apply and produce documentation necessary for application. Week 2: -Demonstrate that you can write a college personal statement with a thesis, at least three body paragraphs, each with a topic sentence and support, and a conclusion. -Produce writing that demonstrates your personal speech style and your values -Produce writing that reflects on your own identity and your goals. -Produce writing that demonstrates cultural competence: awareness that your audience is diverse and will hear you better if they feel respected. Week 3: -Demonstrate knowledge of budget management and personal finance -Demonstrate an understanding of the cost of attendance for 4 year colleges and how the costs break down -Produce a personal budget of your current financial situation and a sample budget of a student at a 4-year college -Demonstrate knowledge of loans, grants and scholarships Timeline ( schedule more specific dates) Synchronization of the Curriculum Hiring of Faculty Training on TRIO population and community needs (TRIO) Curriculum Development Provide past syllabus Math and Budgeting section Grading Contract Speaker Scheduling (TRIO and Faculty) Recruitment (TRIO) Scheduling and Enrollment Assessment

    Student Learning Outcomes
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    -Become familiar with Highline’s student services, faculty, and staff.

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    -Learn basic concepts related to culture and diversity, and cultural experiences other than one’s own.

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    Expand competency in personal budgeting and financial literacy including financial aid awards, cost of attendance and creating a personal budget


Communication Studies

  
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    CMST 080 - Improving Speech Skills

    5 Credits
    Teaches beginning speaking, listening and feedback skills. Includes intellectual, emotional, physical and cross-cultural aspects of communication.

    Course Note Previously SPCH 080.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students who would like continuous practical experience in groups, one-to-one and public speaking.
    Active Date 2012-02-22

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    I. Speaking (public) A. Informative B. Teaching C. Oral reading D. Recordings to improve pronunciation II. Group Participation A. Discussion B. Interviewing C. Problem Solving D. Listening E. Cultural Expectations

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrate understanding of basic oral communication processes.

    Develop leadership skills.

    Improve confidence in public speaking.

    Improve listening skills.

    Participate effectively in a group.

  
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    CMST 091 - Beginning Communication Skills

    5 Credits
    Introduces beginning communication skills, classroom discussion, basic speech organization. Examines communication apprehension.

    Pre-requisite(s) CMST 080
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who have completed CMST 080, with less than a 2.0, in order to prepare them to enter CMST 101 or 220.
    Active Date 2014-01-13

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 20
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Intrapersonal Communicaiton - self exploration Communication Apprehension - treatment techniques Critical Listening Discussion Small Group Communication Informative Speaking

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Demonstrates understanding of the communication process.

    Demonstrate skills necessary to listen effectively in informational and critical settings.

    Construct and present an informative speech.

    Demonstrate appropriate use of visual aids for classroom presentations.

    Identify and apply effective decision-making methods for a group task.

  
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    CMST 103 - CSMT& 101 Completion

    1 Credits
    Designed for students who have taken a four credit Introduction to Communication class and need to earn a fifth credit . Student must have earned a 2.0 or higher in the four-credit class. In order to enroll, students will need to provide proof of successful completion of an introduction to communication course at another college.

    Pre-requisite(s) CMST 101 min 2.0
    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Designed for students who have taken a four credit Introduction to Communication class and need to earn a fifth credit . Student must have earned a 2.0 or higher in the four-credit class.
    Active Date 2012-05-24

    Grading System Credit/Non-Credit
    Class Limit 5
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 10
    Total Contact Hours 10
    Degree Distributions: AA Communications, Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    This one credit course will address area(s) of need to fulfill the Communication Studies 101 requirements. The content areas may include communication theory, intercultural, interpersonal, small group communication and/or public speaking. The specific area(s) will be mutually decided by the student and the instructor, depending on the student’s area of needs. First, review the course work from the other college. Second, identify the area(s) of need and develop appropriate assignment(s) to meet the CMST 101 completion requirement. Last, evaluate the completed assignment(s).

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to identify key concepts in intrapersonal, interpersonal and small group communication as they relate to “real life” situations or “life-like narratives.”

    2. Construct and present effective informative and persuasive public presentations.

    3. Identify and demonstrate principles of information literacy, which includes correct incorporation of highly credible, multifaceted supporting material into public presentations.

    4. Apply principles of diversity in interpersonal, public, and group communication.

  
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    CMST 200 - Intercultural Communication

    5 Credits
    Speech communication theory and strategies designed to enhance the student’s ability to interact with persons from different cultures both within and outside our border. Studied from the perspective of context, and its application to personal relationships and organizational settings.

    Pre-requisite(s) CMST 080 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Completion of CMST& 101 recommended. Previously SPCH 200.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students preparing to be successful in our new global environment.
    Active Date 2012-06-25

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 32
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Diversity & Globalism, Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    This course focuses on communication theory and strategies designed to enhance students’ ability to interact competently and responsibly with persons from different cultures. I. A goal of this course is to increase students’ knowledge of concepts central to intercultural communication and knowledge of specific cultural practices. A. Students gain knowledge of concepts central to intercultural communication theory, including the nature of culture, the influence of power and unearned privilege, and Hofstede-type categories of cultural patterns. B. Students learn to analyze and understand cultural and to gain self knowledge regarding cultural beliefs, values and norms. II. A goal of this course is to develop students’ motivation to understand and respect diverse cultural practices. A. Students learn to prioritize understanding of and respect for (rather than judgment of) diverse cultural beliefs, values, and norms. B. Students learn to distinguish between description, interpretation, and evaluation in their personal responses to cultural practices. C. Students are encouraged to develop and demonstrate critical thinking skills (demonstrating cognitive complexity and the ability to view situations from multiple perspectives). III. A goal of this course is to increase students’ knowledge of concepts central to intercultural communication and knowledge of specific cultural practices. A. Students learn guidelines for productive communication across diverse cultures. B. Students practice engaging in productive discussion with diverse others.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Successful CMST 200 students will show that they can: Identify, explain, and apply knowledge of the nature of culture.

    Identify, explain, and apply concepts central to intercultural communication.

    Understand and apply a dialectical perspective to intercultural relations.

    Distinguish between and practice open-minded description, interpretation, and evaluation components of personal responses to diverse cultural practices.

    Display motivation and ability to interact competently with culturally diverse others.

    In accomplishing each specific outcome, CMST 200 students will be expected to: Develop and demonstrate critical thinking skills (demonstrate cognitive complexity and the ability to view situations from multiple perspectives).

    Analyze cultural others and gain cultural self-knowledge.

    Develop and demonstrate respect for diverse cultural beliefs, values, and norms.

  
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    CMST 205 - Nonverbal Communication

    5 Credits
    Explores perspectives on the prevalence and importance of nonverbal communication in human interaction. Includes effects of environment and space, physical appearance, physical behavior, the eyes and face, and vocal cues on human communication with a special emphasis on understanding intercultural differences.

    Pre-requisite(s) CMST 080 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Completion of CMST& 101 recommended. Previously SPCH 205.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Any student desiring to improve his/her communication skills and develop the ability to better understand others in various cultural settings.
    Active Date 2011-06-13

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    I. Basic Perspectives II. Environment and space effects on human communication. III. Physical appearance and dress IV. Kinetics V. Face and eyes VI. Paralanguage VII. Touch VIII. Nonverbal determinants in business and intercultural communication.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Identify nonverbal codes

    Use nonverbal behavior effectively

    Explain how nonverbal behavior differs between cultures.

    Explain the role of nonverbal behaviors in the making of meaning.

  
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    CMST 291 - Contractual Studies

    1 Credits
    Offers individual activities under the guidance of an instructor. May include Readers Theater or other performance situations, interviewing or projects in interpersonal, nonverbal or public communication.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note Previously SPCH 291.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.
    Active Date 2011-08-15

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 55
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Varies with each course. Course outlines will be submitted for each offering.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.

  
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    CMST 292 - Contractual Studies

    2 Credits
    Offers individual activities under the guidance of an instructor. May include Readers Theater or other performance situations, interviewing or projects in interpersonal, nonverbal or public communication.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note Previously SPCH 292
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.
    Active Date 2013-10-02

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 110
    Total Contact Hours 110
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Varies with each course. Course outlines will be submitted for each offering.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.

  
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    CMST 293 - Contractual Studies

    3 Credits
    Offers individual activities under the guidance of an instructor. May include Readers Theater or other performance situations, interviewing or projects in interpersonal, nonverbal or public communication.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note Previously SPCH 293.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.
    Active Date 2011-08-15

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 165
    Total Contact Hours 165
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Varies with each course. Course outlines will be submitted for each offering.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.

  
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    CMST 294 - Contractual Studies

    4 Credits
    Offers individual activities under the guidance of an instructor. May include Readers Theater or other performance situations, interviewing or projects in interpersonal, nonverbal or public communication.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note Previously SPCH 294.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.
    Active Date 2011-08-15

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 220
    Total Contact Hours 220
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Varies with each course. Course outlines will be submitted for each offering.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.

  
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    CMST 295 - Contractual Studies

    5 Credits
    Offers individual activities under the guidance of an instructor. May include Readers Theater or other performance situations, interviewing or projects in interpersonal, nonverbal or public communication.

    Instructor Permission Required Yes
    Course Note Previously SPCH 295.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.
    Active Date 2011-08-15

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Continuous Enrollment Yes
    Class Limit 99
    Contact Hours: Lecture 0 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 220
    Total Contact Hours 220
    Degree Distributions:
    Course Outline
    Varies with each course. Course outlines will be submitted for each offering.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Varies with individual topics. Course objectives for each quarter will be submitted.

  
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    CMST 320 - Presentation Skills

    5 Credits
    Applied practice in preparation and delivery of extensive or brief, technical and non-technical public speeches. Examines and demonstrates fundamental strategies for logically organized and properly researched presentations to diverse audiences in multifaceted situations. Analyzes and practices engaging delivery dynamics and visual aids usage appropriate for myriad presentation types. Note: If taking this course online, please note that recording of speeches with others will be required.

    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS
    Course Note Admission to a BAS program required.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students who are enrolled in BAS degree programs at Highline College.
    Active Date 2016-06-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Communications
    Course Outline
    1. Fundamentals of public speaking

    a. Communication models; transactional communication with an audience

    b. Audience analysis; speaking to diverse audiences

    c. Ethical speaking

    2. Speech types for industry

    a. Informative speeches

    i. Trainings

    ii. Briefings

    iii. Status reports

    iv. Impromptu for meetings

    b. Persuasive speeches

    i. Problem-solution

    ii. Sales/goodwill pitch

    c. Question and answer sessions

    3. Information literacy for diverse speeches

    4. Language techniques: technical, layperson, word choice, color, rhythm

    5. Notes development

    6. Delivery dynamics relevant to talk type: Notes handling, hand gestures, body positioning, vocal qualities, speaking equipment (lecterns, podiums, other), facial expressions

    7. Visual aids for myriad presentations

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Identifies and demonstrates responsibilities of a speaker presenting to diverse audiences and representing an organization, department, or individual position. (CWO 1, 2, 3)

    2. Constructs varied length, ethical, appropriately researched, logically organized informative and persuasive presentations that meet intended presentation goals in a given speaking situation. (CWO 1, 2, 3, 5)

    3. Distinguishes and implements proper word usage that caters to and engages technical and non-technical audiences. (CWO 1, 3, 4, 5)

    4. Demonstrates delivery dynamics appropriate for the speaking situation and audience. (CWO 3)

    5. Assesses and produces effective visual aids that complement content and speaker purpose, and fit speaking logistics. (CWO 1, 3, 5)

    6. Navigates effective question and answer sessions within or after presentations. (CWO 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

  
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    CMST 330 - Communication and Organizational Behavior

    5 Credits
    Exploration of the theories, theories, structure, and processes of communication in organizations. Applied practice utilizing communication competency as a foundation of organizational change and effectiveness at the individual, group, and organization-wide levels. Focuses on problem-solving, mediation, and resolution within various organizational roles. Note: If taking this course online, please note that recording of prompted conversations and speeches with others will be required.

    Program Admission Required Yes Admitted Program BAS
    Course Note Admission to a BAS program required.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students in one of the four BAS programs.
    Active Date 2016-06-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: BAS Humanities
    Course Outline
    Course Outline:



    Analyze common characteristics of all organizations:



    a. Types



    b. Systems



    c. Norms



    d. Hierarchy



    e. Roles



    f. Culture



    Evaluate existing personal communication behaviors and determine how those behaviors impact a role within an organization.



    a. Communication apprehension



    b. Nonverbal behavior



    c. Listening



    d. Conflict management style



    e. Personality



    f. Temperament



    Analyze communication networks within an organization



    a. Formal communication flow



    b. Impact of communication flow



    Evaluate communication in various organizational roles



    a. Peons



    b. Mid-level workers



    c. Managers



    d. High-ups



    e. Power



    f. Status



    Analyze organizational culture



    a. Figurative culture



    i. Collaboration



    ii. Change



    b. Literal culture



    i. Race/Ethnicity



    ii. Gender



    iii. Ethnocentrism



    c. Meeting culture



    i. Productivity in meetings



    d. Electronic culture



    Evaluate common conflict problems in an organization



    a. Group consensus versus groupthink



    b. Disagreement



    c. Defensiveness



    d. Discrimination



    e. Problem-solving/resolution



    f. Mediation

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Self-reflect and analyze existing communication style and demonstrate the ability to apply or modify communication in an organizational setting. (CWO 1, 2)

    2. Analyze an organization’s culture and incorporate organizational culture in communication methods, including meeting culture and electronic culture. (CWO 1, 2, 3, 4)

    3. Develop effective strategies for communicating in formal versus informal networks, and responding to the impact of communication flow within an organization. (CWO 1, 2, 3, 4)

    4. Construct productive communication strategies that consider cultural differences in organizational settings. (CWO 1, 2, 3, 4)

    5. Evaluate common conflict problems in organizations and discern effective responses for problem-solving, resolution, and mediation. (CWO 1, 2, 3, 4)

    6. Distinguish communication differences of individuals in various organizational roles and apply productive strategies for interaction at the subordinate or supervisory level. (CWO 1, 2, 3, 4)

  
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    CMST& 101 - Introduction to Communication

    5 Credits
    This course explores fundamental elements, characteristics, and processes of human communication, with emphasis on confident and competent dyadic and group discussions and introductory presentation skills. Students analyze and practice effective interaction strategies within interpersonal, intercultural, classroom, professional, and cyberspace contexts. Note: If taking this course online, please note that recording of prompted conversations and speeches with others will be required.

    Pre-requisite(s) READ 081 min 2.0 or CMST 080 min 2.0 or ENGL& 101 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Previously SPCH 100.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve A basic course for students in all fields, both vocational and transfer, who desire to increase skills and the understanding of public speaking as well as interpersonal communication.
    Active Date 2016-06-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: ProfTech Communications
    Course Outline
    I. Intrapersonal Communication III. Public Information

    A. The individual’s communication system A. Speaker-related variables

    B. Self-concept in communication B. The audience as a variable

    C. Processing information: language & thinking C. Message variables

    D. Listening

    II. Interpersonal Communication

    A. Interpersonal communication components

    B. Nonverbal communication

    C. Dyadic communication

    D. Small group communication



    III. Public Information

    A. The individual’s communication system A. Speaker-related variables

    B. Self-concept in communication B. The audience as a variable

    C. Processing information: language & thinking C. Message variables

    Student Learning Outcomes
    1. Identify and articulate the communication process and its application in diverse face-to-face and mediated human communication contexts. (CWO, 1,3,4,5)

    2. Explore key concepts and skills that occur in human communication and explain how those skills influence various personal and professional situations. (CWO 1,3,4,5)

    3. Distinguish how communication strategies differ in certain relationships and groups (face-to-face and mediated), and demonstrate effective interactions within intercultural and multi-faceted dyads and groups . (CWO 1,3,5)

    4. Apply principles of diversity in interpersonal, public, and group communication. (CWO 1,3,4,5)

    5. Document and demonstrate emerging communication competencies via a reflective portfolio.

  
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    CMST& 102 - Introduction to Mass Media

    5 Credits
    Requires students to go beyond their usual role as consumers of the mass media, to think critically about the media as a cultural and economic institution.

    Course Note Previously JRNL 100.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve General distribution humanities students, 2-year students transferring into 4-year journalism/mass media degrees.
    Active Date 2011-06-14

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 38
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    A. Class will begin by covering mass media including news, magazines, radio, etc., and advertising and public relations. B. As course progresses, it will broaden to include various conceptual and theoretical issues, including issues, including ethics, law and issues related to media bias and objectively. C. Class also will discuss inter-cultural perceptions of news and information.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Read and understand mass media and culture and their effect on each other.

    Analyze each of the mediums, such as TV, radio, and newspapers in mass media.

    Understand culture and cultural perspective.

    Become critical thinkers about media and their own roles as consumers and citizenry in a representative system affected by the media.

  
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    CMST& 210 - Interpersonal Communication

    5 Credits
    Offers real-world practice and theoretical foundation in the communication dynamics of personal relationships, including romantic/friend, family and professional contexts. Explores strategies to analyze and improve communication competence in perception, language, self-concept, self-disclosure, listening, conflict management and emotional expression skills.

    Pre-requisite(s) CMST 080 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Completion of CMST& 101 recommended. Previously SPCH 210.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students, including transfer and certificate, who want to improve their interpersonal relationships with family, friends and co-workers.
    Active Date 2011-07-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 22
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    I. The dynamics of communication a. Oral Communication: listening, language, nonverbal b. Basic processes in dyadic interaction c. Communication competence d. II. Analyzing messages in family, professional, friendship, and romantic exchanges a. Variability of design b. Variability of production c. Variability of exchange d. Variability of interpretation e. Managing conflict f. Basic processes in dyadic interaction III. Cultural contexts a. Perception b. Relationship-building c. Nonverbal

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students will identify and demonstrate basic principles of interpersonal communication through performance-based activities, oral presentations, class discussions, and research/reflective written assignments.

    Students will analyze personal traits in themselves and others utilizing behavioral and relational theories of communication.

    Students will participate in a variety of inquiry and delivery methods, including group discussions, dyadic interaction, role playing, and individual speech presentations.

    Students will compile a journal based on text reading assignments, interpersonal observations and outside readings.

    Students will research and deliver through written and oral presentation a final project on some aspect or issue of interpersonal communication.

    Students will gain further public speaking experience exemplified by their verbal and nonverbal efforts and will utilize audience analysis techniques in the preparation of their presentations.

  
  •  

    CMST& 220 - Public Speaking

    5 Credits
    Practical presentation skills in which students develop and deliver a variety of speeches suitable for many settings: job, community and school. Speaking competence is developed including use of audio-visual materials. Note: If taking this course online, please note that recording of speeches with others will be required.

    Pre-requisite(s) CMST 080 min 2.0 or READ 081 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Completion of CMST& 101 recommended. Previously SPCH 213.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve Students and employed people who want to learn about preparation and delivery of public message.
    Active Date 2016-06-13

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I ProfTech Communications
    Course Outline
    1. Theories of public speaking
    2. Developing the speech
    A. Research methods
    B. Organization
    C. Developing speech notes
    D. Audio-visual materials
    3. Delivering the speech
    A. Vocal
    B. Physical
    4. Applied practice and analysis

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Learn theories of public speaking.

    Apply these theories by developing and delivering a variety of public speeches.

    Analyze and improve speech organization and delivery through studying videotapes of their performances.

    Learn to develop and use audio-visual aids effectively.

  
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    CMST& 230 - Small Group Communication

    5 Credits
    Explores leadership and discussion in small group contexts with the goal of developing communication behaviors that promote a more effective and satisfying experience in groups and leadership situations. Addresses the functional problems of leadership, organizations in groups, involvement strategies within groups, problem solving, conflict management, decision making, consensus building, conformity and critical thinking.

    Pre-requisite(s) CMST 080 min 2.0
    Placement Eligibility English 091/Reading 091 or higher
    Course Note Completion of CMST& 101 recommended. Previously SPCH 210.
    Fees 

    Designed to Serve All students seeking to enhance their experiences within groups and teams, whether social or professional. Also, students interested in becoming competent and effective communicators with an emphasis on leadership and participation in groups and teams.
    Active Date 2011-07-06

    Grading System Decimal Grade
    Class Limit 28
    Contact Hours: Lecture 55 Lab 0 Worksite 0 Clinical 0 Other 0
    Total Contact Hours 55
    Degree Distributions: AA Humanities Area I
    Course Outline
    A. Students will gain an understanding of the development of communication effectiveness through a critical analysis of leadership and discussion in small groups, particularly the physical and psychological conditions that influence communication and leadership in groups. B. Group communication theory: groups as systems, group development, group climate, roles and leadership in groups, developing effective teams, group discussion strategies (recognizing both defective and effective decision making and problem solving), power dynamics in groups, conflict management, technology and virtual groups, and group oral presentations.

    Student Learning Outcomes
    Students will gain a comprehensive knowledge of small group and team communication processes through readings, videos, and group activities.

    Students will apply conceptual ideas about effective group discussion techniques to practical communication situations.

    Students will develop communication competence in small group and team settings

    Students will explore various decision making techniques (e.g., majority, minority, or unanimity/consensus rule) in problem solving situations

    Students will think critically, analyzing arguments from different points of view and cultural/diverse perspectives, demonstrating how conflict can be a productive part of communication.

    Students will develop communication behaviors that promote a more effective, efficient, and satisfying interaction in groups and leadership contexts.

 

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